Greece & Rome
Humanities 110 Conference 20
         
         

Spring Syllabus

Printable Version of Spring Syllabus: Standard (pdf); TR Version(pdf )

Fall: Standard ; Fall Syllabus with Links

Course Description

Books & E-texts (Spring)

Books & E-texts (Fall)

Goals
Conference #21

Just For Fun!

Roman Republic
Introduction
Livy
Lucretius
Golden Latin
Introduction
Augustus
Ara Pacis
Garnsey & Saller
Virgil
Silver Latin
Introduction
Ovid
Tacitus (Annals)
Seneca
Tacitus (Germania)
Judaism
Introduction
Genesis (Josephus Day 1)
Midterm
Exodus
Josephus (Day 2)
Tractate Avot
Early Christianity
Introduction
St. Paul
Gospel of Matthew
Gospel of Thomas
Gospel of John
Late Antiquity
Introduction
Post-Classical City
Apuleius
St. Perpetua
St. Anthony
Plotinus
St. Augustine
FINAL

 

 

 

Course Description:

The second term is devoted to a consideration of imperial Rome and to the encounter between classical culture and the Judeo-Christian tradition. The course examines the background and ideology of the early Principate as developed and described by the major authors of the Augustan Age, including Livy, Virgil, and Ovid. The political, philosophical, and historical implications of this development are traced in the works of Seneca and Tacitus. The second half of the spring semester begins with a reading of Hebrew biblical materials and then examines both non-canonical texts of the Jewish and Christian traditions as well as New Testament materials. After a detailed investigation of the confrontation between Christianity and the Roman world, the course concludes with St. Augustine's Confessions, in which the values and ambitions of classical antiquity are developed in the light of an emergent Christian orthodoxy.

Conference #20
Meeting Times & Place: T/Th, 1:10 -2:30 in Library 201.
Conference Leader: Prof. Laura Leibman, Dept. of English
Office Hours: Tuesday 12-1, Wed. 11-12 & by appointment
Laura's Office: L392, x7329
Class moodle

Goals:
o Become Superb Conference Participants
o Become Smarter Readers
o Expand Critical Thinking (particularly your ability to do close readings of texts, analytical comparisons of texts, and critiques of arguments.)
o Increase Analytical Writing Skills
o Learn to Write With Clarity and Grace
o Learn to Use the Library and the Web as Reference Tools
o Understand and Apply Basic Logic to Reading, Writing, and Speaking
o Understand Differences Between Disciplines and Estimate the Sorts of Questions People from a Discipline Would Ask about a Text
o Be able to place Greek Texts from the Archaic through Hellenistic Periods in a Cultural and Historical Context and present interesting, analytical hypotheses about their Meanings.

 

Just For Fun!
o Send a Roman E-Postcard!
o Hebrew Bible Coloring Pages

oFinding the Antichrist: A Quiz (Frontline: Apocalypse! PBS)
oBeastly Jokes
oOlde Reed Humour circa 1997: "The Traditionally Badly Titled HUM 110 Play Translated by Richmond Lattimore With Revisions by C.D.C Reeve" By Brent Miller and Brett Rogers (Frank and Spoon) Originally by Greg Lam

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


   

SYLLABUS

The Roman Republic  

Overviews to the Roman Republic(read & compare!)

Online Exhibits:

 

Week 1
Jan. 24 Charles Freeman, Egypt, Greece and Rome, chapters 16 to 21; Clifford Geertz, “Religion as a Cultural System” (in Readings)
Lecture: Observing Imperialism: Alexander, Hellenism and the Rise of the Roman Machine / Pancho Savery


Jan. 26 Livy, The Rise of Rome, Preface and Book I, pp. 3-70
Lecture: Livy and the Re-Creation of Rome / Walter Englert

Jan. 28 Livy, The Rise of Rome, Book 2 and Book 5.19-end, pp. 71-139, 302-341
Lecture: Livy and Roman Virtue / Tony Iaccarino

Livy Day 1 Study Questions (L. Leibman

Livy Day 2 Study Questions & Practice Passage (L. Leibman)

Logic: Livy & Conditional Syllogism (L. Leibman)

Hum 110 Tech: Livy's History (Wally Englert, Reed College)

Livy Study Topics (Reed College)

The Roman Name (John Porter, University of Saskatchewan)

Test Your Knowledge of the City of Rome: Can you Label this Map? (Solution)


Golden Latin ("Age of Augustus")  

Overviews to the Age of Augustus:

  • "Rome the Age of Augustus"(Richard Hooker, Washington State University). Excerpt: "The Age of Augustus is known as the Golden Age of Roman literature, for during this time flourished the greatest poets of Rome. Under Augustus, poets and artists were patronized not by individuals, but solely through the princeps himself. To this end, Augustus appointed a cultural advisor, Maecenas, to aid him in extending patronage to poets. The result was an incredibly powerful system for identifying the best poets who could further the ideology of the Augustan government." (Click here for full text)
  • Hum 110 Timeline for the Roman World (N. Nicholson, Reed College)

 

Week 2

Jan. 31 Augustus, The Accomplishments of Augustus; Suetonius' "Augustus" from The Twelve Caesars (both in Readings); Freeman, chapter 22.
Lecture: From Octavian to Augustus / Ellen Millender

Lecture Images (Fac Millender-Database); More Images of Augustus from Classics Database (Millender/Nice)

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors (Richard D. Weigel, DIR)

Augustus Study Questions (D. Silverman, Reed College)

Res Gestae Study Questions (L. Leibman)

Hum 110Tech: Conference Slides for the Roman World

The Amaranthine Republic: The Uses of "Res Publica" in the Politics and Histories of Augustus (Carl Anderson, Lecture for Reed College Humanities, Spring 2000)

Augustus: Images of Power (Mark Morford, Classics Department, University of Virginia)

Dates in the Life of Augustus (John Paul Adams, CSU Northridge)


Feb. 2 Galinsky,"Art and Architecture"; Holliday, "Time, History, and Ritual on the Ara Pacis Augustae"; (both in Readings)
Lecture: Contexts for the Ara Pacis / William Diebold

 

Hum 110Tech: Ara Pacis Slides

Sample Article Review: Natalie Kampen's "The Muted Other" (L. Leibman)

Feb. 4 Garnsey and Saller, The Roman Empire, Chapters 2, 6-9, Conclusion (in Readings).
Lecture: Families and Friends / Michael Breen

Hum 110 Tech: Material Culture at Pompeii (L. Arnold Leibman, Reed College)

Notes on Garnsey and Saller, Chapters 1, 2, and 6 (David Silverman, Reed College)


Week 3

Feb. 7 Virgil, Aeneid, Books 1-4
Lecture: Eros and Empire / Nathalia King


Feb. 9 Virgil, Aeneid, Books 5-8
Lecture: Virgil and Ekphrasis / Elizabeth Drumm

Feb. 11 Virgil, Aeneid, Books 9-12
Lecture: The Ending of the Aeneid / Walter Englert

Aeneid Study Topics: Metaphors & Literary Analysis (L. Leibman)

Poetic Pilgrimages and The Aeneid: Background & Study Questions (L. Leibman)

Virgil Study Topics (D. Silverman, Reed College)

Hum 110 Tech: Virgil's Aeneid (David Silverman, Reed College)

Virgil.org: Maps, Texts, Biography, Bibliography & more (David Wilson-Okamura)

Art & the Aeneid (Timothy Moore, U Texas)

The Vatican Vergil: selected illustrations from a richly illuminated early manuscript. Includes Dido on her pyre

Test Your Knowledge of the City of Rome: Can you Label this Map? (Solution)

 

FIRST PAPER DUE Saturday, Feb. 12th 5 p.m.., VIA EMAIL.

Questions? Contact your fearless leader at Laura.Leibman@Reed.edu

Online Paper Help: Doyle OWL (Reed College's Online Writing Lab)

Want a Tutor? Check Out Reed's Writing Center located in ETC 112
Regular Hours: Sun. to Thurs. 7-9 PM
Special Hours before Hum 110 Paper due dates: Thurs. and Fri. 7-10 PM
or email the Writing Center Staff to request a regular tutor.

 

 

Silver Latin  

Overview to Silver Latin:

  • "Silver Latin" (Nigel Nicholson, Hum 110 Lecture 2/18/00; Reed College)
  • Excerpt 1: "The century that begins with Ovid is often known today as the Silver Age, the Age in which Silver Latin was produced. The Golden Age that preceded it was an age of great talents who respected the rules and understood the seriousness of words, Livy, Virgil and the orator Cicero. But Ovid was the pied piper leading out the rats of the Silver Age, whose grammar was questionable and taste even more so. The usual features assigned to the art of the silver age are those I traced in Ovid's Met[amorphoses] for the first part of this lecture: (1) a disregard for the classical canons of unity; (2) the confusion of the audience as to how to respond; (3) a relish for the grotesque and disgusting; and (4) an elegant, even over elegant style and the consequent mismatch between this style and a disgusting content." (Click here for the full text)

    Excerpt 2: "II.3 Two Questions for the Silver Age Narrative
    [Gordon] Williams offers one way in which we might organize the relationship between Virgil and Ovid, between the pre-Augustan and the post-Augustan: a Golden Age gave way to a Silver Age under the pressures of political and social change, and Ovid inaugurated the change. ... I think there is much in Williams' narrative, but we need to ask two particular questions of it. First, does it runs the risk of reifying an unreal level of difference between works in each period, and between the periods themselves? Does it cause us to ignore similarities between Golden and Silver Age works? And, second, we should look at the judgment that is part and parcel of this narrative and ask whose interest this narrative, and its negative judgment of Ovid, serves." (Click here for the full text)

  • Gordon Williams' characterization of Silver Latin authors: "Writers adapted themselves and their values not only to fear, but also to the desire to impress, to a sense of the superiority of the Greeks no less than to that of great Roman predecessors, to irrationality and sensationalism, and to a wistful romantic escapism. ... Some made adaptations with success; but in general the proportion of decline involved in the adjustment of values steadily increased until the sense of belonging to a living tradition was completely lost, and Roman writers, vainly imitating Greek predecessors, groped back into the most remote past to find, at any price, some shred of novelty. That is not just change: that is decline". Williams, Change and Decline, 5 (Nicholson SILVER LATIN Lecture Handout Hum 110, 2/19/99)

Week 4

Feb. 14 Ovid, Metamorphoses, Books 1-3
Lecture: Erring by Design / Jay Dickson
Tuesday Feb 15 "The Roman Arena," video presentation, 8:00-9:00 pm, Psych. 105

Feb. 16 Ovid, Metamorphoses, Books 4-6, 15
Lecture: Silver Latin / Nigel Nicholson

Ovid as TRANSITION TEXT FROM GOLD TO SILVER LATIN: from "Silver Latin" (Nigel Nicholson, Hum 110 Lecture 2/18/00; Reed College)

Ovid: Study Questions & Characters to Track (L. Leibman)

The Structure of Ovid's Metamorphoses (Joseph Farrell, University of Pennsylvania)

 

Feb. 18 Tacitus, Annals, pp. 31-60, 90-99, 104-128
Lecture: Of Empire and Emperors: Tacitus and The Writing of History / Alex Nice


Saturday Feb. 19 "I, Claudius" ("Family Matters" "Poison is Queen"), video presentation,
7:00-9:00 pm, Psychology 105

Tacitus 1st Day Study Questions (L. Leibman)

Tacitus (Annals) Discussion Questions (Reed College)

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors (Richard D. Weigel, DIR)

 

Week 5

Feb. 21 Tacitus, Annals, pp. 157-255
Lecture: Between Republic and Empire / Michael Breen
Tuesday Feb. 22 "I, Claudius" ("Zeus! By Jove," "A God in Colchester"), video presentation, 7:00-9:00 pm, Psych. 105


Feb. 23 Tacitus, Annals, pp. 275-324, 335-397
Lecture: Gossip / Jay Dickson

Tacitus (Annals) Discussion Questions (Reed College)

Tacitus 1st Day Study Questions (L. Leibman)

Tacitus 2nd Day Study Questions (L. Leibman)

"At that repulsive gathering, his had been merely a female part" (Tac. Ann. XI.36):
Gender Boundaries in Ancient Rome
"(Nigel Nicholson, Hum 110 Lecture Spring 2000; Reed College)

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors (Richard D. Weigel, DIR)

Images of the Caesars (Classics Dept., Beloit University)

VRoma Image Archive

Test Your Knowledge of the City of Rome: Can you Label this Map? (Solution)

 

Feb. 25 Seneca, The Stoic Philosophy of Seneca: On Providence, On the Tranquillity of the Mind,
and Letters, 47, 65, 70
Lecture: Stoicism and the Bad / Paul Hovda

"Tacitean Irony and Stoic Suicide" (Carl Anderson Hum 110 Lecture 23 Feb 2000, Reed College)


Week 6

WILD CARD: LUCRETIUS (Lucretius wrote during the Republic--why is he here??)

Feb. 28 Lucretius, The Way Things Are (De Rerum Natura),
Books 1 and 3
Lecture: Epicurean Naturalism / Paul Hovda

March 2 Lucretius, The Way Things Are (De Rerum Natura),
Books 5 and 6
Lecture: The Trouble with Being Dead / Steve Arkonovich


March 3 Guest Lecture: Professor Eric Gruen / VLH, 7:30 PM
Lucretius Study Questions (Reed College)

Lucretius Study Questions: Beginnings and Elegies(L. Leibman)

Outline Lucretius' The Way Things Are(Reed College)

 

March 4 Tacitus, Germania in The Agricola and the Germania; Tacitus, Histories 5. 1-10 (in Readings)
Lecture: Two Cities: Identity and Alterity / Nathalia King

Tacitus’ Germania: Background (L. Leibman)

Germania Study Topics (Reed College)

Agricola Quotes (Hum 110, Reed College)

Roman Views of Jews and Christians:A collection of primary sources (Minott Kerr, Reed College)

Anti-seminitism in the Roman Empire (Florida Holocaust Museum)

Images: Germania inferior (1) (Jona Lendering, Livius: Articles on Ancient History)

 

Judaism in the Roman Empire  

Overviews to Judaism in the Roman Empire:

  • Review of Jews in a Graeco-Roman World (Rochelle Caviness). Excerpt: "The history of the Roman empire covers a vast span of time. Throughout its existence, the Romans came into contact with numerous culturally distinct peoples. Many groups were simply destroyed or absorbed into the fabric of the Roman empire. Other groups, which were not completely assimilated, tended to incorporate various practices and traits of the Roman's culture into their own, which had the effect of radically altering their cultural base. Very few groups managed to maintain a distinct identity while living in the very midst of the Roman empire. One group that was able to resist the encroachment of Roman ideas, and maintain their own unique cultural and religious identity, was the Jews .Unlike other minority groups which became intertwined with the Roman apparatus, the Jews not only maintained their own cultural identity and practices, but they also left behind written and archeological records of their existence and life under Roman rule. This record gives historians a phenomenal resource. Most minority groups did not leave behind any written documentary evidence of their life. Therefore they can only be studied from the Roman perspective and through Roman documentation of their existence. The Jews, however, can be studied from both their own, and the Roman perspective, giving them a three-dimensional character from which a more accurate accounting of their history can be surmised." (Click here for the Complete Text)
  • SUMMARY COMMENTS ON SECOND TEMPLE JEWISH SECTS AND PARTIES (J. Scott, Wheaton University) There was a great deal of variety in Second Temple Judaism: socially, culturally, and theologically. This handout lists some major strands.
  • Second Temple Judaism Archives (The Bible and Interpretation, LCCC). Resources on women, synagogues, witches, revolts, and more.
  • Judea: First Century Judaism (LIVIUS: Articles on Ancient History)
  • Diaspora Jews, Romans, Others in The Greek Style Cities of the First Century Crimea
    (Robert S. MacLennan, Macalester University)

Resources:

Week 7

March 7 Josephus, The Jewish War, pp 27-132; Tacitus, Histories 5. 1-10 (in Readings)
Lecture: The Empire Writes Back / Laura Leibman

THE ENEMY WITHIN: A Lecture on Josephus’ History of the Jewish War (L. Leibman; Spring 2000)

Josephus: Chronology of the Jewish War. compiled by G. J. Goldberg (Flavius Josephus
Home Page
)

josephus.yorku.ca, a site dedicated to the scholarly study of the works of Flavius Josephus. Includes Study Tools

Roman Views of Jews and Christians:A collection of primary sources (Minott Kerr, Reed College)

Anti-seminitism in the Roman Empire (Florida Holocaust Museum)

Wars between the Jews and Romans: the destruction of Jerusalem (70 CE) (Jona Lendering, LIVIUS: Articles on Ancient History)



March 9 Genesis: 1-21; Stephen Geller, “The Religion of the Bible”; Marc Zvi Brettler, “The Canonization of the Bible” (both in Readings)
Lecture: Back to Basics / Kambiz GhaneaBassiri

Genesis Study Question (L. Leibman)

Philo Study Questions: Jewish Literature from the Roman Empire (L. Leibman)

 


March 11 MID-TERM EXAM: 9-9:50 a.m., in VLH

12-19 MARCH: SPRING BREAK

Week 8
March 21 Genesis 21-50; Nancy Jay, "The Logic of Sacrifice" and "Sacrifice and Descent"
(in Readings)
Lecture: Sacrifices and Stories / Gail Sherman

Genesis Study Question (L. Leibman)


March 23 Exodus 1-23
Lecture: History as Sacred Text / David Garrett


March 25 Exodus 24-40; Jonathan Klawans, “Concepts of Purity in the Bible”; Mary Douglas, “Secular Defilement” and “The Abominations of Leviticus” (both in Readings)
Lecture: To Distinguish Holy from Unholy: Sacrifice and Purities in the Torah / Steve Wasserstrom

 

Exodus Study Questions (Reed College)

Exodus Study Questions & Reading The Torah for Pleasure (L. Leibman)

Map: The Route of Exodus (Barry Bandstra, Hope College)

 

SECOND PAPER DUE Saturday,March 26th, 5p.m.., VIA EMAIL.

Questions? Contact your fearless leader at Laura.Leibman@Reed.edu

Online Paper Help: Doyle OWL (Reed College's Online Writing Lab)

Want a Tutor? Check Out Reed's Writing Center located in ETC 112
Regular Hours: Sun. to Thurs. 7-9 PM
Special Hours before Hum 110 Paper due dates: Thurs. and Fri. 7-10 PM
or email the Writing Center Staff to request a regular tutor.


Early Christianity & Judaism after the Fall of the Temple  

Overview to Early Christianity:

Early Christianity (Richard Hooker, WSU). Excerpt: "The principle character of early Christianity is the gradual translation of the Jewish religion of Christianity into the Greek and Roman world view. The initial stage of this process overlaps with foundational Christianity; the most important figure in the transformation of Christianity into a non-Jewish religion was [St.] Paul of Tarsus, one of the founders of the religion—the division between foundational and early Christianity is not a neat one. This process of transformation is also evidenced in the earliest histories of Jesus of Nazareth, the Gospels, in which Greek ideas often flow freely. The compilers of the Gospels were already familiar with the movement of Christianity into the Greek and Roman worlds and are trying to account for it in some way. The history most influenced by Greek thought is the Gospel of John, a very late history, whose narrative is structured almost completely around Greek ideas giving it a character vastly different from the earlier histories."

Resources:

Week 9

March 28 Paul, Romans; Acts 9-19; Frend, "Paul and the First Expansion 30-65" (in Readings)
Lecture: Paul, Apostle to the Gentiles / Robert Knapp

St. Paul Study Questions (L. Leibman)

Study Grid: The New Testament (L. Leibman)

Paul Timeline & Passages from St. Paul's Romans (Hum 110, Reed College)

Bible Maps:  Paul's First and Second Journey (Crosswalk.com)

Reading Communities & St. Paul’s Epistle to the Romans: An 18th Century Native American Reading
(L. Arnold Leibman, Humanities 110 Spring '02)



March 30 Josephus, The Jewish War, pp. 133-48, and 287-408.
Lecture: Varieties of Religious Experience / Nathalia King

THE ENEMY WITHIN: A Lecture on Josephus’ History of the Jewish War (L. Leibman; Spring 2000)

Josephus: Chronology of the Jewish War. compiled by G. J. Goldberg (Flavius Josephus
Home Page
)

josephus.yorku.ca, a site dedicated to the scholarly study of the works of Flavius Josephus. Includes Study Tools

Roman Views of Jews and Christians:A collection of primary sources (Minott Kerr, Reed College)

Anti-seminitism in the Roman Empire (Florida Holocaust Museum)

Wars between the Jews and Romans: the destruction of Jerusalem (70 CE) (Jona Lendering, LIVIUS: Articles on Ancient History)


Thursday March 31 "From Jesus to Christ," video presentation, 7:00-9:00 pm, Bio 19


April 1 Gospel of Matthew; Gospel of Thomas (in Readings)
Lecture: Interpretation in Matthew and Thomas / Gail Sherman


The Gospel of Matthew: Study Questions (L. Leibman)

Important persons in the New Testament (romansonline.com)

The Gospels of John and Thomas: Background & Questions (L. Leibman)

Hum 110 Tech: Gnosticism

Week 10
April 4 Gospel of John
Lecture: Between Jew and Hellene: the Emerging Christian Community of the
Gospel of John / Ellen Stauder

The Gospel of John: Context & Study Questions (L. Leibman)

Anti-seminitism in the Roman Empire (Florida Holocaust Museum)

Study Grid: The New Testament (L. Leibman)


Tuesday April 5 "From Jesus to Christ," video presentation, 7:00-9:00 pm, Psych. 105


April 6 The Tractate Avot (The Ethics of the Fathers); Benjamin Sommer, “Inner-biblical Interpretration”; Yaakov Elam, “Classical Rabbinical Interpretation” (both in Readings)
Lecture: Tractate Avot and Rabbinic Law / Steve Wasserstrom

The Tractate Avot (Ethics of the Fathers) Study Questions (L. Leibman)



Late Antiquity  

Overviews to Late Antiquity (read & compare!)

  • Overview of Late Antiquity (Steven Muhlberger, Nipissing University)
  • Averil Cameron – The Mediterranean World in Late Antiquity, A.D. 395-600 (UK-Learning)
  • Late Antiquity (Dr. E.L. Skip Knox, Boise State University). Excerpt: "When people talk about the 'fall of the Roman Empire,' they usually envision some sort of event: a particular year, perhaps, or at least a particular generation. A little bit of study might yield some specific dates: 476, or 455, or 410. All such ideas are fundamentally misleading because they over-simplify what the Roman Empire was, and they overlook social and economic developments in favor of strictly political developments. The very notion of a fall implies that something was standing, and that this something was a cohesive entity. In fact, Rome was always a patchwork, held together only at the very top....A different way of considering matters is to leave aside entirely the idea of a "fall" and to talk instead about the transition from the ancient world to the medieval world. ...How did this transformation come about?"
  • "To Carthage and Beyond: African in the Roman Imagination" (Hum 110 Lecture 4/15/98; Professor Laura Arnold Leibman"

    Excerpt 1:"It is not a coincidence that the many of great writers and events of Late Antiquity arose in Africa (Apuleius, St. Anthony, St. Augustine, St. Perpetua all from Roman North Africa and Egypt). Africa was the center. Late Antiquity (the period from 200-700 AD ) is a period of transformation: the shift of Africa from periphery to center reflects this change." (Bibliography; "To Carthage and Beyond: African in the Roman Imagination" (Hum 110 Lecture 4/15/98; Professor Laura Arnold Leibman" )

    Excerpt 2: "Late Antiquity (200-700 AD) is characterized by the acceptance of Christianity as state religion, increasing border troubles in west and east, and the grand solution of dividing the empire into two halves (Nicholson's Timeline; Liebeschuetz 4). About the same time there a sharp decline in the quality of Italian cities and their artistic production. ...One major exception to this decline was the cities in North Africa: this alone is sufficient explanation for the beauty of the mosaics found throughout the third and fourth centuries in Africa (whether in public baths, or private houses) and the flourishing of artistry. (Bibliography; "To Carthage and Beyond: African in the Roman Imagination" (Hum 110 Lecture 4/15/98; Professor Laura Arnold Leibman" )

 

Resources:

 

Week 10, cont.

April 8 Joseph Gutman, “The Synagogue at Dura-Europos”; Wharton, Refiguring the Post Classical City; (both in Readings)
Lecture: Jews and Christians in Dura-Europos / William Diebold

Early 4th Century Roman Villa and Mosaics (Mary Ann Sullivan, Bluffton College)

Test your knowledge of CITY - PLAN OF CONSTANTINOPLE: Can you label this map? (Solution)

Hum 110Tech: Imaging Roman North Africa (L. Arnold Leibman)

 

Week 11
April 11 Apuleius, Golden Ass
Lecture: Telling Stories / Gail Sherman


April 13 Apuleius, Golden Ass
Lecture: A Serious Joke: The Golden Ass Between Religion and Philosophy/
Steve Wasserstrom

Apuleius' Golden Ass: Study Questions (L. Leibman)

Apuleius, Apology (J.J. O'Donnell, U. Penn./Georgetown)

Magic in the Daily Life of a Roman Province:The North African Background of Apuleius's Trial for Sorcery
( Gil Renberg)

 

April 15 Athanasius, Life of St. Anthony
Lecture: Holy Bodies / Ray Kierstead

Life of Anthony Study Questions (L. Leibman)

 

Week 12
April 18 The Martyrdom of Saints Perpetua and Felicitas (in Readings); Brown, The World of Late Antiquity, pp. 1-112
Lecture: The Martyrdom of Perpetua / Nathalia King

The Martyrdom of Saints Perpetua and Felicitas: Study Questions (L Leibman & Minott Kerr, Reed College)

Query: Was Perpetua Black? (L. Leibman)


April 20 Plotinus, I.6 ("Beauty"), pp. 33-44; V.9, ("The Intelligence, The Ideas and Being"), pp. 45-58; III,8 ("Contemplation,"), pp. 162-176.
Lecture: Plotinus and His Roots in Plato and Aristotle / Margaret Scharle

The Late Empire (193-476) and Plotinus: Background & Study Questions (L. Leibman)

Reedie Paper on Plotinus: Brett Holverstott, "On Plotinus, Christianity, and Mysticism" (HUM 110, Reed College
completed 5/08/02)

 


April 22 Augustine, Confessions
Lecture: "So Tiny a Child, So Many Pages"/ / Nigel Nicholson

Augustine Study Questions Books 1-6 (L. Leibman)

"Augustine and the Art of Transformation" (L. Arnold Leibman, Reed College 1997); Lecture Handout Spring 2002

Augustine of Hippo (J.J. O'Donnell, U. Penn./Georgetown)

 

THIRD PAPER DUE Saturday, April 23rd, 5 p.m. VIA EMAIL. TOPIC

Self-Evaluation (M. Scharle): Please complete and bring to your paper conference!

Turning Paper Topics Into Questions (J. Williams, A. Hrycak; ed. L. Leibman)

Questions? Contact your fearless leader at Laura.Leibman@Reed.edu

Online Paper Help: Doyle OWL (Reed College's Online Writing Lab)

Want a Tutor? Check Out Reed's Writing Center located in ETC 112
Regular Hours: Sun. to Thurs. 7-9 PM
Special Hours before Hum 110 Paper due dates: Thurs. and Fri. 7-10 PM
or email the Writing Center Staff to request a regular tutor.

Week 13

April 25 Augustine, Confessions
Lecture: Augustine and Ambrose in Milan / William Diebold

April 27 Augustine, Confessions
Lecture: Augustine and the Problem of Evil / Steve Arkonovich


April 29 Augustine, Confessions
Lecture: The End / Jan Mieszkowski

Augustine Study Questions Books 1-6 (L. Leibman)

Augustine Study Questions: Books 7-9 (L. Leibman)

Augustine Study Questions Books 10-13 & Quotes on Sources of Evil (L. Leibman)

"Augustine and the Art of Transformation" (L. Arnold Leibman, Reed College 1997); Lecture Handout Spring 2002 (pdf Version)

Why do we need to read the end of Augustine's Text? The Narrative of Pilgrimage (or "Founding the New City")
(L. Leibman)

Study Grid: Comparison of Epicurean , Stoic, and Augustine's Doctrines pdf (Hum110, Reed College; Prof. Wally Englert) Study Grid word (click here to download to desktop)

Augustine of Hippo (J.J. O'Donnell, U. Penn./Georgetown)

 

FINAL EXAM, Monday, May 9, 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m., Vollum Lecture Hall

Final Exam Study Tips (L. Leibman)

Study Grids:

Historical Periods Study Grid, Spring pdf (L. Leibman) Historical Periods Grid word (click to download to desktop)

Study Grid for Books pdf (L. Leibman) Study Grid for Books word (click to download to desktop)

Study Grid for Themes pdf (L. Leibman) Study Grid for Themes word (click to download to desktop)

Study Grid for Disciplines pdf (L. Leibman) Study Grid for Disciplines word (click to download to desktop)

Study Grid: The New Testament pdf (L. Leibman) Study Grid: The New Testament word (click to download to desktop)

Study Grid: Comparison of Epicurean , Stoic, and Augustine's Doctrines pdf (Hum110, Reed College; Prof. Wally Englert) Study Grid word (click here to download to desktop)

Passages to Practice Identifying for the Final:

Practice Passages for Final Exam (L. Leibman)

Practice Passages for Final Exam (L. Leibman)

Practice Passages for Final Exam (L. Leibman)

Practice Passages for Final Exam (L. Leibman)

Practice Passages for Final Exam: Sources of Evil (L. Leibman)

Hum 110 Timeline for the Roman World (N. Nicholson)

Hum 110 Final Exam Study Questions Spring 1997

Hum 110 Final Exam Study Questions Spring 1996

Humanities 110 Final Examination - 8 May 1996

   

Conference 21 Meets T/Th, 1:10 -2:30 in Library 387.

Conference Leader: Prof. Laura Leibman, Dept. of English

Conference 21 Page| Paper Topics| |Timelines| Writing Help|

Hum 110 Tech | Hum 110 Page

2005 Laura Leibman, Reed College