American English

Ed Sheeran tries American Accents

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In this video, British singer Ed Sheeran is asked by a fan during a Q&A session to do his best "American Accent". He goes on to say that he can do three different ones, starting with the "Valley Girl from California" one, then moving to the "Regular" one and ending with the "Southern Draw" one. Since English is obviously one language in and of itself, but different English speaking countries have different accents. For example, Ed has a British English accent. But there are also Australian English accents, Irish English accents, and so on. There are different accents for different parts of the world, but there are also sub-accents in different parts of the same country, as shown here by Mr. Sheeran.

Posted by Lauren Drummond on July 21, 2017

Tags:
Southern English;
American English;
British English;
English;
Accent

Martin Impersonates Daphne (Frasier)

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A scene from the show Frasier which showcases Martin Crane teasing Daphne Moon's English Accent. I see a two linguistic-anthropology elements in the scene. First, by code-switching dialect during the interaction he is drawing attention to the fact that Daphne is not American. What this accomplishes is up for debate given that the two are friends and that the interaction was not hostile in nature. I'm guessing that the impression may mildly suggest that the two are not on equal footing; one is a "native" while the other isn't. This may work in elevating Martin's position in the argument. Second, Martin mentions how Daphne is always complaining about what to do with her hair. Here he is indexing a gender identity that might conflict with his own. In the reading I came across portions that relate language use as a form of identity expression and so while Daphne was being expressive of her female identity Martin, annoyed by her, replied with an antagonistic male critique of her speech.

People Around the World Try an American Accent

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In this video, a handful of people from all over the world attempt their best shot at an American accent. Some are good while others, not so good. However, the portrayal of American stereotypes is extremely evident throughout the attempts at an accent. This shows how the language ideologies and styles of multiple American communities can ultimately create many "speech Communities".

American Vs. British Slang

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The video I found is what the different slangs that people use in America and British. In the video, the two girls, Kaelyn who’s from America and Lucy who comes from England gave a pop quiz to each other about throw out several slangs and ask what the other person expecting the meanings of the slang words or phrases to show us how different language use in different cultures. For example, "packing heat" means carrying a gun and the word "slayed" means you own it. We can also hear the differences about American and British accent. There is a mass of different types of languages and within those languages, there are a lot of accents in those cultures. Some of them are influenced by genetic and geographical reasons, and some others are learned in particularly social setting. I think all of us are learning new knowledges frequently.

Posted by Rui Wei on June 26, 2017

Tags:
American English;
British English;
English;
Slang

Why Germans Can Say Things No One Else Can

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This video talks about language and it's ability to allow for thought, emotion, and the expression of feelings. It talks specifically about the German language and how they have a wide variety of words they can use to better describe a situation or feeling other languages might not be able to do as effectively. It explains many examples of this, along with the appropriate meaning in English. Having a different set of words to think with and use allows for a wide variety of unique knowledge one can obtain. This video just scratches the surface of the importance of language, and how language in our lives can change the way we think and interpret the world around us.

British People Attempting Their Best American Accent

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This is titled "British People Attempting Their Best American Accent," which really encapsulates the main point of the video. Essentially, aside from a handful of outliers, the attempts at accents reflected stereotypes that some British people tend to think Americans hold. The accents revolved around "Southern," "Californian/Surfer," and "Hyper-Metropolitan" accents. The words included by those speaking generally reflected stereotypes involving surfing and smoking weed (for the Californian/Surfer), eating cheeseburgers, shopping, and gossip (Hyper-Metropolitan), and drinking beer and shooting guns (Southern). The participants were not asked to do a specific kind of "American accent," either, they merely did an accent that they deemed to be what is "the American accent." How Americans are perceived by these participants was evident in their style of speech and words chosen to reflect typical American conversation along; one could also possibly argue that this reflects that some British people group all of the American identities into one conglomerate identity which they deem to be wholly "American." Thinking about this more outside of the video, I feel that this could be true in terms of how Americans think of other cultures as well, like how Americans think of the British identities.

"Fancy-speak"

A box for a chocolate lava cake from Domino's Pizza which refers to French as "fancy-speak" which relates to our discussion of language ideologies. [Published on 03-15-2017]

Posted by Adrian Leary on April 15, 2017

Tags:
Ideology;
American English;
French

Do You Speak American?

This is an article and analytical piece by Robert MacNeil, an employee of PBS since the 1980s. He talks about how moving to America and adopting American grammatical policies in order to work for television. [Published on 2005]

Why Do People In Old Movies Talk Weird?

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The history of the transatlantic accent.

Posted by Nicole Niesen on February 28, 2017

Tags:
American English;
British English;
Socioeconomic Status;
Accent

Jamila Lyiscott: 3 ways to speak English

Jamila Lyiscott is a “tri-tongued orator;” in her powerful spoken-word essay “Broken English,” she celebrates — and challenges — the three distinct flavors of English she speaks with her friends, in the classroom and with her parents. As she explores the complicated history and present-day identity that each language represents, she unpacks what it means to be “articulate.” [Published on 02-01-2014]

He is Mi and I am Yu

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This is a clip from the movie Rush Hour 3 where Agent Carter is confused because of translations between Chinese and English. This clip touches issues on multilinguistic practices, translation, communication barriers, and so on. Because of the differences Agent Carter was getting frustrated making the situation worse.

An English Language Cop

This is a clip from Larry David's Curb Your Enthusiasm. Larry David corrects Richard Lewis' speech. Richard says, "in their private homes," and Larry corrects him with , "the privacy of their homes?" Larry David's correction displays language ideology because there was no misunderstanding, he was just being, as Richard Lewis points out, "an English language cop." Then, Larry notes that Richard utters the word "collapse" in the same way he does. It makes sense that these two would speak with the same dialect or accent since they are lifelong friends and both from New York City. When this is brought to Richard's attention, he denies sharing this with Larry and pronounces "collapse" according to Standard American English. [Published on 01-05-2015]

Brits And Americans Don't Speak The Same Language In The Kitchen

The Author, a U.K. native moves to the United States. She attempts to make cookies with her child and learns, due cultural disconnect in wordage, she is actually making biscuits. [Published on 10-13-2011]

Posted by Kristen Noel on July 29, 2016

Tags:
American English;
English;
Globalization;
Semantics

Cespedes receives Home Run Derby trophy

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Pedro Gomez, an American born reporter translates for Spanish speaking MLB players. This specific example is at the 2014 Home Run Derby where Gomez translates for Yoenis Cespedes.

Posted by William Parmelee on July 29, 2016

Tags:
American English;
Spanish;
Code-switching

Code-Switching and Performativity in MMA

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UFC Mixed Martial Arts fighter John Lineker is interviewed following his 07-13-16 victory in the promotion's first event in South Dakota, responding primarily in Portuguese. Lineker code-switches to English at the end of the interview to direct a message to the champion (U.S. mixed martial artist Dominick Cruz) of his weight division. His promise of "coming for" the champion demonstrates a performative illocutionary act: by directing these words to Cruz, he is simultaneously performing the very action of threatening and talking about this action.

Posted by Jill Vesta on July 21, 2016

Tags:
Performativity;
American English;
Code-switching

Ebonics Dictionary

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In this video stand up comedian Steve Harvey explains the complexity of Ebonics. Although he is African American Steve Harvey's stand up routine plays into certain African American stereotypes while pointing out the differences between American English and AAVE.

Coca Cola por el orgullo de ser latino

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In this video that is supposed to celebrate Hispanic Heritage month Coca Cola has been accused of hispandering. This is evident in that the men and women in the video are discussing their pride in their heritage and family names as they are printed on the side of Coca Cola cans. Not only did Coke decide to put the names on the cans but they made them temporary tattoos. Many latinos have condemned the video as a pathetic attempt to bring in more latino customers. They have also said the tattoos could play into latino stereotypes. Check it out and decide for yourself.

Posted by Ariana Moll on March 14, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
Performativity;
American English;
Spanish;
Race,Ethnicity

How to Speak Ghetto

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In this video a African American female is shown translating basic everyday conversations and saying's from proper english to "Ghetto." In the video it is also important to note the difference in the tone of voice and energy being used by both speakers. The male speaker seems to be purposely speaking in a overly proper tone and the girl seems to be overtly loud and sassy in an attempt to further demonstrate the language variation.

Hugh Laurie: the British slang vs the American

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This is a video clip from an episode of Ellen where British actor Hugh Laurie comes on the show. They play a game of "American vs. English slang" where they test each other on whether they understand different types of American and British slang. They go back and forth with each other and test each other's knowledge of what the different types of slang mean.

Posted by Matt Kaufman on March 8, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
American English;
British English;
English;
Accent;
Slang

What does English sound like to a foreigner

This article describes and provides a video about what non Americans, or british people hear when they hear english being spoken. Complete gibberish. And when an Italian artist records a song completely in English but doesn't know how to use our grammatical syntax and structure, it still sounds like nonsense. [Published on 05-06-2013]

Posted by Ainise Havili on March 7, 2016

Tags:
American English;
Grammaticalization;
Accent

17 Reasons Americans Should Be Embarrassed They Only Speak English

This article gives insight onto why only being able to speak English, as is common to a majority of American's, is not a good thing. This article expresses how, as American's we should strive to learn other languages instead of expecting others to know ours. [Published on 03-19-2014]

How American accents are changing

A detailed map of how American accents are changing.

Mapping How Americans Talk - Soda vs. Pop vs. Coke

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This video shows the numerous dialects found in and around America. The video also shows us that despite speaking the same language, we can have multiple different words to describe a single product or object.

Posted by Ariana Moll on March 3, 2016

Tags:
American English;
Variation

Dating a Latina

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Dating a Latina: Perception vs Reality. This video is funny, some may be able to relate to it. This video exhibits Spanish, American English, and Code Switching.

Time to say goodbye

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Andrea and Sarah Brightman were invited to perform the duet 'Time To Say Goodbye (Con Te Partirò). I love this song and I do not even know what they are saying, until code-switching occurs. I do not know the language that they are singing in?

Posted by Mylls Cheffey on March 3, 2016

Tags:
Power;
American English;
Code-switching

Tense Present: Democracy, English and the Wars Over Usage

David Foster Wallace reviews 'A Dictionary of Modern American Usage'. In so doing, Wallace explores how language rules are developed and on what authority they are created. Near the end he tells a story about trying to convince students to write in what he calls SWE "Standard Written English" or "Standard White English". [Published on 04-01-2001]

Chalamette, LA- A Study in Dialect Marginalization

A specific study of the stigmatization of a particular dialect in a suburb of New Orleans. [Published on 03-01-2016]

Posted by Mark Beal on March 1, 2016

Tags:
Ideology;
American English;
Stigma

The Linguistic Sex Appeal of the Unicorn

Mark Peters discusses how the word unicorn is beginning to be used to describe unique, desirable and highly unattainable business goals. He also discusses the appeal of other similar terms such as just bump, couch surfing, and cyberbully. [Published on 02-21-2016]

Posted by Jared Nietfeld on March 1, 2016

Tags:
American English;
Change

Don't get mad when transplants copy how you talk

An Atlantic article about regional dialect acquisition or accommodation in North America., with quotes from Kirk Hazen and Jen Nycz. [Published on 02-19-2016]

Posted by Kara Becker on February 23, 2016

Tags:
American English;
Accommodation

How Code-Switching Explains The World

This NPR article addresses the linguistic practices of code switching and how prevalent it is in today's society. NPR's approach is not as true to the linguistic anthropologist term because it looks at different linguistic practices and behaviors of individuals when interacting with different groups or in different settings. It looks at at broader range than just the mixture of two different languages.

Posted by Meaghan Kuhlmann on February 21, 2016

Tags:
American English;
Code-switching;
Language Shift;
Communities of Practice

Sign Language Exchange Between Starbucks Barista and Customer Inspires Others

A Starbucks Barista initially trying to take an order in English then code-switching to ASL to communicate. This video also includes specific language used only in Starbucks, for example the sizes of the orders. [Published on 11-04-2015]

The politics of twisted tongues and loopy lingo

A segment on NPR's The Takeaway looking at the use of regional features by politicians, particularly the positive associations from these accents that may serve a politician's goal of connecting with constituents. [Published on 10-26-2015]

Posted by Kara Becker on October 28, 2015

Tags:
American English;
Politics and Policy

NYT: 'NPR Voice' has taken over the airwaves

An analysis of the confessional style of many journalists on NPR. [Published on 10-24-2015]

Posted by Kara Becker on October 28, 2015

Tags:
American English

Arizona news anchor is drawn into debate on her accent and use of Spanish

A Spanish/English bilingual newscaster on an Arizona TV station is criticized for her pronunciation and use of Spanish. She wonderfully says, "change can be hard, but it's normal." [Published on 09-03-2015]

Posted by Kara Becker on September 17, 2015

Tags:
American English;
Spanish;
Monolingualism;
Multilingualism

From upspeak to vocal fry: Are we "policing" young women's voices?

An episode of Fresh Air with sociolinguist Penny Eckert, in part a response to a recent episode of Fresh Air with a speech pathologist who criticized features used by young people in American English. [Published on 07-23-2015]

Posted by Kara Becker on July 24, 2015

Tags:
American English;
Youth;
Gender;
Womens Language

Filmmaker and Speech Pathologist weigh in on what it means to "sound gay"

An episode of Fresh Air, profiling a filmmaker who made a documentary about sounding gay, as well as an interview with a speech pathologist who makes a number of troubling comments about features of youth language, including high rising terminals, creaky voice, and discourse markers. [Published on 07-05-2015]

In defense of "textspeak:" A socio-linguist says emojis and LoLs are modernizing English

A description of some forms of internet language and how the contribute to change in American English. [Published on 05-04-2015]

Posted by Kara Becker on May 14, 2015

Tags:
American English;
Change;
Internet Language

How Y’all, Youse and You Guys Talk

This is a quiz on the NY Times website based on the Harvard Dialect Survey. It gives you a map of which places in the US speak most similar to you. I thought of this when we were talking about conceptions of American dialects.

Posted by Gregor McGee on February 19, 2015

Tags:
American English;
Variation;
Accent;
Lexicon

Fuhgeddaboudit: New York Accent On Its Way Out, Linguists Say

This is just a short article that looks at the inevitability of language change. Although it mostly talks about neutralization, I feel as though other processes and possible future developments are left out in a way that makes it more sensational for the average reader, especially New Yorkers. [Published on 02-02-2015]

Posted by Tyler Helton on February 3, 2015

Tags:
New York City English;
American English;
Change

At the Super Bowl of Linguistics, may the best word win

New York TImes coverage of the American Dialect Society's Word of the Year vote, in which the first ever hashtag, #blacklivesmatter, was selected as the Word of 2014. [Published on 01-16-2015]

Posted by Kara Becker on January 20, 2015

Tags:
American English;
Lexicon

Why do people say "like" so much?

A Grammar Girl post that summarizes Alex D'arcy's research on the discourse functions of like. [Published on 12-05-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on December 8, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Youth;
Discourse Marker

The n-word: An Interactive Feature

An interactive piece on use of the word "nigger" in contemporary American English, with interviews from varying perspectives and on varying aspects of the term's use, including in- vs. out-group usage, reclamation, and its use in hip hop culture. [Published on 11-10-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on November 10, 2014

Tags:
American English;
African American English;
Race,Ethnicity;
Lexicon

Which English you speak has nothing to do with how smart you are

A Slate guest post by linguist Anne H. Charity Hudley addressing issues of language discrimination in U.S. schools based on the use of nonstandard varieties and features. She argues in favor of embracing language diversity in the classroom. [Published on 10-14-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on October 15, 2014

Tags:
American English;
African American English;
Variation;
Education;
Stigma

What's Wrong with "America's Ugliest Accent" Tournament

Slate.com's version of Joe Fruehwald's objections to the Gawker tournament where voters select "America's Ugliest Accent." [Published on 10-02-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on October 2, 2014

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
American English;
Accent;
Stigma

Nefertiti Menoe: Speaking White

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A video by artist Nefertiti Menoe on the criticism of minority speakers as 'speaking white.' She disagrees with this characterization, saying "having proper diction doesn't belong to the Caucasian race." The video sparked the long-time debate over accusations of speaking 'white' in the U.S.

America's Ugliest Accents: Something's Ugly Alright

Sociolinguistic Josef Fruehwald responds to the Gawker "Ugliest Accent" tournament, highlighting the use of language as a proxy for discrimination against speakers from various social and geographic groups. [Published on 10-01-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on October 1, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Accent;
Stigma

Skwerl

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Related to what we were talking about in class today (Prisecolinensinenciousol), I thought this video does a really good job of sounding like American English. There are a few times that they use real English words, but most of it is gibberish.

Posted by Miriam Gölz on September 18, 2014

Tags:
Ideology;
Standard Language Ideology;
American English

Prisecolinensinenciousol

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This is a parody made by Adriano Celentano for the Italian TV programme Mileluci. It is sung entirely in gibberish designed to mimic what American English sounds like to non-English speakers. I'm sure a few of you have seen this before, but it's always entertaining.

Posted by Shiloh on September 16, 2014

Tags:
Standard Language Ideology;
American English

Coca-Cola's 2014 Super Bowl Ad

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The coke ad from the 2014 Super Bowl, in which "America the Beautiful" is sung in multiple languages. This ad sparked much internet controversy related to the U.S.' ideology of monolingualism.

Posted by Kara Becker on September 3, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Monolingualism;
Multilingualism

American Tongues: Tough Guy from Boston's North End

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An excerpt from the documentary American Tongues profiling speakers from the North End of Boston.

American Tongues: The Odd Accent of Tangier, VA

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An excerpt from the documentary American Tongues on the variety of English spoken on Tangier Island, Virginia.

Posted by Kara Becker on August 28, 2014

Tags:
American English

When Ordering Speak English

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States with English-Only Legislation

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James Crawford's map from 2003 showing those states that have adopted English-Only legislation.

U.S. English

The official website of U.S. English, the oldest citizen's action group dedicated to making English the official language of the United States.

Posted by Kara Becker on August 28, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Monolingualism;
Politics and Policy

25 Questions for Teaching with "Word Crimes"

Lauren Squires provides a linguist's perspective on Weird Al's spoof "Word Crimes," with practical suggestions for how teachers might use the video to teach important lessons about prescriptivism. [Published on 07-17-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on July 18, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Internet Language;
Prescriptivism

Vocal Fry may hurt women's job propsects

An Atlantic article summarizing the study of Anderson et al that concluded that use of creaky voice makes women less hireable. [Published on 05-29-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on June 12, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Youth;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Creaky Voice

Vocal Fry doesn't harm your career prospects

A critique of the Anderson et al. study that found that females using creaky voice were judged less desirable. The author points out that the matched guise approach involved speakers who were taught to produce more creaky guises, so that the creak is an imitation. Further, the creaky utterances were longer and had lower pitch, raising questions about what listeners were reacting to. [Published on 06-06-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on June 12, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Youth;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Stigma;
Creaky Voice

Study: Women with creaky voices deemed less hireable

The Washington Post reports a research study that found that women who used creaky voice were judged by listeners to be less competent, less educated, less trustworthy, less attractive, and less hireable. The research team concludes that speakers should "should undertake conscious effort to avoid vocal fry in labor market settings." [Published on 06-02-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on June 11, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Youth;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Stigma;
Creaky Voice

The Language of Maya Angelou

Sociolinguist Anne H. Charity Hudley discusses the linguistic legacy of Dr. Maya Angelou. Although Angelou spoke out against the legitimacy of African American English during the Ebonics Controversy in the late 1990s, Charity Hudley points out her use of many features of AAE, from morphosyntax to discourse. [Published on 05-29-2014]

Hashtags are the new scarce quotes

the various stances that a hashtag can convey, including distance, solidarity, and sarcasm

Posted by Kara Becker on May 12, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Internet Language;
Discourse

The Origins of Office Speak

An article that describes the evolution of "office speak" or business jargon, in American English, across the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. [Published on 04-24-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on April 25, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Discourse;
Lexicon

Super Bowl's Coke Ad Didn't Sit too well with some people

A discussion of the negative reactions to Coke's 2014 Super Bowl ad, in which "America the beautiful" was sung in a number of languages. [Published on 02-03-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on April 21, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Monolingualism;
Multilingualism

The importance of dual immersion programs

A discussion of the merits of bilingual education, including dual immersion, that includes comments from sociolinguist Phillip Carter. [Published on 04-12-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on April 21, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Spanish;
Education;
Multilingualism

NYTimes: Like, Degrading the Language? No Way

An op-ed by John McWhorter arguing that many recent innovations in American English - including "like," "totally," and "because X," are positive developments, and even enhance politeness strategies. [Published on 04-05-2014]

Posted by Kara Becker on April 7, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Slang;
Discourse Marker

A call for respecting dialect diversity

A 2014 opinion piece profiling the work of Walt Wolfram and colleagues at N.C. State who have a dialect diversity program designed to raise awareness about dialect diversity and the way language is used as a proxy to discriminate

Posted by Kara Becker on March 9, 2014

Tags:
American English;
Education;
Monolingualism;
Stigma

How Y’all, Youse and You Guys Talk: Personal Dialect Map Activity

"What does the way you speak say about where you’re from? Answer all the questions below to see your personal dialect map."

Posted by Sara Mulliner on December 23, 2013

Tags:
American English;
Chain shift;
Merger

How Y’all, Youse and You Guys Talk: Personal Dialect Map Activity

"What does the way you speak say about where you’re from? Answer all the questions below to see your personal dialect map. About This Quiz Most of the questions used in this quiz are based on those in the Harvard Dialect Survey, a linguistics project begun in 2002 by Bert Vaux and Scott Golder. The original questions and results for that survey can be found on Dr. Vaux's current website. The data for the quiz and maps shown here come from over 350,000 survey responses collected from August to October 2013 by Josh Katz, a graphics editor for the New York Times who developed this quiz. The colors on the large heat map correspond to the probability that a randomly selected person in that location would respond to a randomly selected survey question the same way that you did. The three smaller maps show which answer most contributed to those cities being named the most (or least) similar to you."

Posted by Sara Mulliner on December 23, 2013

Tags:
American English;
Chain shift;
Merger

Dude, Where's my Accent?

A 2013 Portland Monthly article on recent research that the California Vowel Shift is used in Oregon English.

Mapping how America Talks

The Atlantic compiled audio recordings from the Harvard Dialect Survey and the maps of Jonathan Katz from the same dataset into a video.

Posted by Kara Becker on December 10, 2013

Tags:
American English;
Accent;
Lexicon

Sociolinguist debunks Miami English misconceptions

An article including a video with Phillip Carter on his research on Miami English

Posted by Kara Becker on October 24, 2013

Tags:
Miami English;
American English;
Spanish;
Multilingualism

The sexiest accents in North America

A 2013 article on nj.com reporting that the Jersey accent is one of the top five "sexiest" accents, according to a survey on cupid.com

Posted by Kara Becker on October 24, 2013

Tags:
American English;
Perceptual Dialectology

Dialect Survey Maps

From Jonathan Katz, a statistician at NC State University, with links to a dialect quiz in both short and long-form

Posted by Kara Becker on September 21, 2013

Tags:
American English;
Lexicon

CBS News: Burned out on Vocal Fry

A 2013 video segment on the use of creaky voice by young American women, and how irritating many people find it.

Posted by Kara Becker on September 21, 2013

Tags:
American English;
Youth;
Gender;
Womens Language;
Creaky Voice

English Only Rule Scrapped at Utah Prisons

A 2013 article on slate.com documenting the removal of the U.S.'s only written rule from a state prison limiting the language used during prisoner visits to English only.

English to English

A tumblr maintained by the Guardian's New York office, documenting cultural differences between British and American English as well as popular culture.

Posted by Kara Becker on July 8, 2013

Tags:
American English;
British English

"He may be dead"

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A clip from the show Flight of the Conchords where a dialect-based misunderstanding is a source of serious confusion.

Posted by Meredith Tamminga on June 19, 2013

Tags:
American English;
New Zealand English;
Chain shift

Like, You Know

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A performance from poet Taylor Mali entitled "Like, you know" that comments on the use of a number of features of youth language.

Posted by Kara Becker on April 11, 2013

Tags:
American English;
Youth;
Discourse Marker;
High Rising Intonation

Teaching Tolerance: Sound Effects

A 2013 article in the Southern Poverty Law Center's "Teaching Tolerance" publication about addressing linguistic diversity in the classroom.

Posted by Kara Becker on April 1, 2013

Tags:
American English;
African American English;
Education;
Stigma

Buzzfeed: The Ultimate Regional Vocabulary Throwdown

A 2013 Buzzfeed list of a number of regionally distinguished lexical items, including pop and soda, sub and its variants, tennis shoes and sneakers, and more.

Posted by Kara Becker on March 20, 2013

Tags:
American English;
Lexicon

Why do British Singers sound American?

A 2013 Slate article about the continuing trend for British pop singers to adopt American pronunciation when singing, including the use of /r/ vocalization. Peter Trudgill's work on the Beatles is cited.

Posted by Kara Becker on February 25, 2013

Tags:
Trudgill, Peter;
American English;
British English;
r vocalization

North American English Dialects

A 2013 piece on Iowa Public Radio on North American English dialects.

Posted on February 1, 2013

Tags:
Change;
American English

American Talk: The cast of Harry Potter

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The cast of Harry Potter read phrases related to American culture in their best American accents

Posted on November 13, 2012

Tags:
American English;
British English;
Accent

American Tongues: Lexicon

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A segment from American Tongues highlighting lexical variation in American English.

Posted on November 1, 2012

Tags:
American English;
Lexicon

Ellen: British vs. American slang

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Ellen Degeneres and Hugh Laurie quiz each other on American and British slang

NewsHour: English as an Official Language

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A 2007 segment from NewsHour with Carmen Fought and someone from U.S English debating the proposal to make English the official language of the United States.

Americans Are Barmy Over Britishisms

Discussion of increasing popularity of British vernacular in American English.

The Dialectizer

This website "translates" any web page into a variety of "dialects:" Redneck, Jive, Cockney, Elmer Fudd, Swedish Chef, Moron, Pig Latin, and Hacker.

Diction Coach: Singin' in the Rain

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A scene from the 1952 musical Singin' in the Rain, with a diction coach working on a particularly tense short-a before nasals

Posted on October 4, 2012

Tags:
short-a;
American English

Prisecolinensinenciousol

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This is a parody song by Adriano Celentano for the Italian TV programme Mileluci, sung in gibberish meant to sound like American English.

Posted on October 2, 2012

Tags:
American English;
Accent

Quiz: What American accent do you have?

A short quiz that identifies your American accent, using criteria like low-back merger, pin-pen merger, and the Mary-merry-marry distinction.

The Wire: female police officer Kima Greggs

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The character Kima Greggs from the HBO series The Wire, in a scene where she aligns with masculine linguistic practices and other attributes. The character is female and homosexual.

Special K, Can't Hardly Wait

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The character Special K from the 1998 movie Can't Hardly Wait is a good example of the linguistic practice of crossing.

Landover Baptist Children's Hospital Homosexual Reparative Ward

Spoof of homosexual lisping corrective surgery.

How to speak with an American Accent

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A commercial advertising accent reduction services designed to enhance speakers' American accents.

KFC Double Down

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A 2010 Kentucky Fried Chicken commercial where men speaking with (synthesized) higher mean pitch are "masculinized" by eating the Double Down sandwich.

Posted on September 25, 2012

Tags:
American English;
Pitch;
Gender Binary

Do you Speak American? website

The interactive website based on the 2004 PBS documentary Do you speak American? with content, interactive features, and resources for educators.

Posted on September 15, 2012

Tags:
American English

The Leonard Lopate Show: Regional Accents

A 2009 segment of WNYC's the Leonard Lopate show on American regional accents, with guests Natalie Schilling-Estes and Kara Becker.

Posted on September 15, 2012

Tags:
American English;
Accent;
Schilling, Natalie

Generic Names for Soft Drinks

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Map created in 2004 showing the distribution of pop, soda, and coke in the United States.

Posted on September 13, 2012

Tags:
American English;
Lexicon

Fair Housing PSA

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PSA highlighting linguistic discrimination.

Eddie Izzard on Being Bilingual

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Eddie Izzard stand-up about British English vs. American English and the tendency of monolingualism in native English speakers.

Arizona Education Loses the Accent of America

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Romanian immigrant reflects on Arizona's elimination of educators with accents.

Linguistic Profiling on 20/20

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20/20 feature on racial linguistic profiling and housing discrimination with linguist John Baugh.