Reed Magazine February
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2003
Rabbet Run title

From the beginning Rogowski’s philosophy and approach to work was firmly grounded in the Arts and Crafts movement’s dedication to simplicity and integrity. His work gradually evolved into a modern sculptural style, incorporating glass and metal into more playful, kinetic designs, like a mahogany coffee table with a beveled and rabetted top that seems to float. Recently he has found renewed inspiration in more traditional forms, but his work is a unique amalgamation of wide-ranging influences—the elegantly sweeping lines of a sturdy oak stool reveal themselves as the shape of a Chinese character, while the sharply angled legs of a koa, aluminum, and glass writing table are distinctly Art Deco.

rabbet picsRogowski’s fine furniture drew praise—he designed and built the desks and tables for the Oregon State Archives in Salem, his largest public commission—but he struggled to find a market. As much as he loved the work, his distaste for business nearly led him a few years ago to ditch everything and look for something new to do.

Instead, Rogowski reinvented himself as a teacher and writer, coming full circle to his college career plans. He’s never enjoyed so much success. He has written numerous articles for Fine Woodworking magazine; written two books, including The Complete Illustrated Guide to Joinery, an impressively illustrated text for hobbyists; and starred in a series of instructional videos such as Twelve Ways to Make a Mortise and Tenon.

And after teaching woodworking at art schools in the area for decades he finally decided to start his own school and transformed his workspace into the Northwest Woodworking Studio. The idea took off—last year he enrolled around 300 students, and he plans to expand offerings in 2003.

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Reed Magazine February
Go to Page 1 go to page two Page 3, you are here go to page 4 Link to Reed Mag  Home
2003