Charles Tauber `77 struggles to create the antidote to hatred in postwar Croatia

The worst part of being here now is not having the resources to do a damned thing. We know what we need to do, we know how to do it, but we can't act.


Dr. Charles Tauber '77 sounds weary but patient as he explains the difficulty he's been living with for years. We are talking with his colleague Pavle Jankovic on the back porch of what was once a family home in Vukovar, Croatia. It now houses the organization Tauber has worked with since 1995-the Coalition for Work with Psychotrauma and Peace (CWWPP). In the sunshine, the sounds of sparrows and nearby chickens punctuate the pauses in our conversation.

I'd known Tauber since 1970, when he was a Sierra Club volunteer in New York City. I'd kept in touch when he traveled west to study at Reed and later, when he moved to Europe, trained as a physician, and then studied psychiatry in the Netherlands. We'd lost contact until I found him in a recent internet search and renewed our friendship. A phone call from him, describing his work with refugees and other victims of ethnic hostilities in Croatia, has prompted my visit.




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