News Center

News from the Reed College public affairs office

Search: or

Features

Events

Reed College Highlights Civil Rights, Art, and Jazz During Black History Month


Civil rights leader Julian Bond, jazz musician Randy Weston, and historian Robin D.G. Kelley appear at Reed College in February to celebrate Black History Month.


PORTLAND, OR (February 1, 2007) – Civil rights leader and NAACP chairman Julian Bond will kick off Black History Month at Reed College with a lecture on “Civil Rights: In the Day, Today, and Tomorrow.” Events in February also include an exhibition of an original silkscreen print by African American artist Jacob Lawrence, a jazz performance by the Randy Weston Quartet, a lecture on Thelonious Monk by historian Robin D.G. Kelley, and a presentation of “The Incredible Journey of Jazz” in cooperation with the Portland Jazz Festival.

Julian Bond
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 2, 8 P.M.
KAUL AUDITORIUM, REED COLLEGE
“CIVIL RIGHTS: IN THE DAY, TODAY, AND TOMORROW”.
Bond, at the forefront of social change for five decades, helped to found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) while a student at historically black Morehouse College during the early 1960s. He was co-chair of a successful challenge delegation to the 1968 Democratic Convention, and served in the Georgia legislature as both a representative and as a senator. Since 1998, he has served as chairman of the board of the NAACP, the oldest and largest civil rights organization in the United States. In 2002, he received the prestigious National Freedom Award. The holder of 23 honorary degrees, Bond is a distinguished adjunct professor at American University in Washington, D.C., and a professor of history at the University of Virginia.

Jacob Lawrence
CONFRONTATION AT THE BRIDGE AND EXHIBITION POSTERS
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1, THROUGH WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14
VOLLUM LOUNGE, REED COLLEGE (FOR SPECIFIC VIEWING HOURS, CALL 503/517-7935)
Confrontation at the Bridge, an original silkscreen print by Jacob Lawrence, will be on view at Reed College. The print depicts the civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, on March 7, 1965, when protesters met with brutal resistance on the Edmund Pettus Bridge and were forced to turn back. The print (edition no. 69 of 175) was a gift to Reed from the Conair Corporation, and is part of the permanent collection of Reed’s Douglas F. Cooley Memorial Art Gallery.

Reproductions of Jacob Lawrence’s work—including museum exhibition posters of his “Migration of the American Negro” series and two children’s books that he illustrated, Harriet and the Promised Land and Aesop’s Fables—will also be on display at Reed through February 14. An accompanying school outreach program, directed by Geraldine Ondrizek, associate professor of art at Reed, will draw Portland-area elementary and secondary school students to Reed. More than 300 students from six Portland public schools are scheduled to participate.

Randy Weston Quartet
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 8 P.M.
KAUL AUDITORIUM, REED COLLEGE
For six decades, Randy Weston has remained one of the world’s foremost pianists and composers. Widely regarded as a musical innovator and visionary, Weston was named a National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master in 2001. Born in New York and immersed in a rich musical culture, Weston counts Cecil Payne, Coleman Hawkins, Duke Ellington, and Thelonious Monk among his friends and teachers. In 1967, after a tour of 14 African countries, Weston made his home in Morocco, where he lived for six years, infusing his style with the music of the region. Today, Weston’s compositions continue to inform and inspire, bringing together American and African musical traditions.

Robin D.G. Kelley
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 8 P.M.
VOLLUM LECTURE HALL, REED COLLEGE
 “‘JAZZ AND FREEDOM GO HAND IN HAND’: THELONIOUS MONK PLAYS THE ’60s”
A tenured professor since the age of 32, Robin Kelley is a widely respected scholar, activist, and author whose work as a historian is focused on the black working class and the neoconservative demonization of the urban poor. A professor of history and African and American studies and ethnicity at USC, he is the author of numerous books, including Race Rebels: Culture, Politics, and the Black Working Class (1994), Into the Fire: African Americans Since 1970 (1996), and Freedom Dreams: The Black Radical Imagination (2002). His current project—a biography of Thelonious Monk—results from years of support from the Monk family, including unprecedented access to the Monk Institute’s historical documents and archives.

The Incredible Journey of Jazz
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2 P.M.
KAUL AUDITORIUM, REED COLLEGE
Once again, the Portland Jazz Festival and Reed College team up to present “The Incredible Journey of Jazz”—a special program designed for school-age children and their parents—as a free, public performance. This 75-minute program tells the story of jazz from its roots in African music and culture, through its development in the United States, to its current role as one of America’s most treasured contributions to world culture. Presented by the Leroy Vinnegar Jazz Institute.