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Reed College's Visiting Writers Fall Series concludes with Portland poet David Biespiel on November 10


The Fall 2005 Series features five writers, including Kevin Sampsell, Lee Peterson, Joanna Scott, Greg Bottoms, and Biespiel


PORTLAND, OR (August 30, 2005) - Reed College's Fall 2005 Visiting Writers Series will conclude with a reading by Portlander David Biespiel at 8 p.m. on November 10, 2005.

David Biespiel is the author of the poetry collections Wild Civility and Shattering Air. His work has appeared widely in journals such as American Poetry Review, Parnassus, Poetry, and The New Republic, and in the anthologies The New American Poets and American Poetry: The Next Generation. Biespiel, awarded a Stegner Fellowship in poetry at Stanford and a NEA Fellowship in Literature, has taught at Stanford, the University of Maryland, George Washington University, Portland State University, and Oregon State University. He lives in Portland, Oregon, where he is Director and Writer in Residence at The Attic, a literary studio and haven for writers.

Reed's visiting writers series brings acclaimed and emerging contemporary writers and poets to read at the campus for the enjoyment of the public and the Reed academic community. The Spring 2006 Visiting Writer Series begins with poet Frank X. Gaspar on Thursday, January 26.

All readings are free and open to the public.

All readings will be held at 8 p.m. in the psychology auditorium, room 105 . Use the east parking lot off Southeast Woodstock Boulevard and follow the signage to the adjacent psychology building.

For more information, the public is asked to visit web.reed.edu/visiting_writers/ or call the events hotline at 503/777-7755.


KEVIN SAMPSELL – 8 p.m., Thursday, September 15
Psychology Building Auditorium, Room 105

Kevin Sampsell is the author of the short story collection Beautiful Blemish, which was nominated for a nerve.com Henry Miller Award and called by Publishers Weekly, "whimsical, hilarious, and cryptic...a gem of warmhearted idiosyncrasy and oddball observation." He is also the author of many other small books such as A Common Pornography and the editor of an anthology, The Insomniac Reader: Stories of the Night. Sampsell has run his micro-press, Future Tense Books, since 1990. Besides publishing fiction, he is also the founding member of the haiku performance group Haiku Inferno and his reviews appear widely. He lives in Portland.


LEE PETERSON – 8 p.m., Thursday, September 29
Psychology Building Auditorium, Room 105

Lee Peterson's first book, Rooms and Fields: Dramatic Monologues from the War in Bosnia, was selected by Jean Valentine for the 2003 Stan and Tom Wick Poetry Prize. In her introduction Valentine writes: "What a rare thing it is to find the meeting of historical, political and poetic wisdom." Peterson's poetry has been published in North American Review, Runes: A Review of Poetry, Nimrod: International Journal of Prose and Poetry, and The Seattle Review. She received an M.F.A. from Sarah Lawrence College and a B.A. from Oberlin College, and is currently instructor of English at Penn State, Altoona. She lives in Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania


JOANNA SCOTT – 8 p.m., Thursday, October 6
Psychology Building Auditorium, Room 105

Joanna Scott is the author of six novels, including Tourmaline, Make Believe, The Manikin, and Arrogance, and a collection of short fiction, Various Antidotes. Her fiction and essays have appeared in The Paris Review, Harpers, Esquire, Conjunctions, The Southern Review, and other journals. Her books have been finalists for the Pulitzer Prize and the PEN-Faulkner. Awards include a MacArthur Fellowship, a Lannan Literary Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and the Rosenthal Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. She is the Roswell Smith Burrows Professor of English at the University of Rochester. Her newest novel, Liberation, will be published by Little, Brown in September 2005.


GREG BOTTOMS – 8 p.m., Thursday, November 3
Psychology Building Auditorium, Room 105

Greg Bottoms' first book, the memoir Angelhead: My Brother's Descent into Madness, was an Esquire “Book of the Year” in 2000. Sentimental, Heartbroken Rednecks: Stories, which blurs across the genres of memoir, the essay, and fiction, was published in 2001 to wide critical acclaim. His writing has appeared in Esquire, The Oxford American, Salon, Creative Nonfiction, The North American, and elsewhere, and his criticism regularly appears in Bookforum. He is currently completing The Colorful Apocalypse, a travel narrative about his visits and interviews with three Christian fundamentalist outsider artists in the United States. An assistant professor of English at the University of Vermont, he now lives in northwestern New England.


DAVID BIESPIEL - 8 p.m., Thursday, November 10
Psychology Building Auditorium, Room 105

David Biespiel is the author of the poetry collections Wild Civility and Shattering Air. His work has appeared widely in journals such as American Poetry Review, Parnassus, Poetry, and The New Republic, and in the anthologies The New American Poets and American Poetry: The Next Generation. Biespiel, awarded a Stegner Fellowship in poetry at Stanford and a NEA Fellowship in Literature, has taught at Stanford, the University of Maryland, George Washington University, Portland State University, and Oregon State University. He lives in Portland, Oregon, where he is Director and Writer in Residence at The Attic, a literary studio and haven for writers.