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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


Media Contact

Beth Sorensen
Office of Communications
503/777-7574
beth.sorensen@reed.edu


McMASTER UNIVERSITY PSYCHOLOGISTS TO LECTURE AT REED

January 10, 2001
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
McMASTER UNIVERSITY PSYCHOLOGISTS TO LECTURE AT REED

Two noted psychology professors from McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, will present lectures at Reed College on Monday, February 19. Lorraine Allan will discuss color aftereffects, learning, and perception at 4:15 p.m. in the psychology auditorium. Shepard Siegel will talk about the role of learning in drug addiction at 7:30 p.m. in Vollum lecture hall (more about the lectures follows). Both lectures, sponsored by Reed's division of psychology, religion, and philosophy, are free and open to the public. For more information, call the Reed events hotline at 503/777-7755.

Learning and perception: why do we see color where there is none?
Monday, February 19, 4:15 p.m., psychology auditorium
Lorraine Allan, Department of Psychology, McMaster University

Adaptation to a perceptual event often results in a negative aftereffect. For example, after exposure to a green square on a computer monitor, a white square will appear pink. A particularly interesting type of color aftereffect was described by Celeste McCollough in 1965 and is termed the "McCollough effect." Unlike other perceptual aftereffects, the McCollough effect can persist for days, weeks, and even months. Why do we experience the McCollough effect? Allan will show how the answer to this question indicates the close relationship between learning and perception, and elucidates the role of learning in homeostatic regulation.

"Cravings of the Mind:" Drug Anticipation and Drug Addiction
Monday, February 19, 7:30 p.m., Vollum lecture hall
Shepard Siegel, Department of Psychology, McMaster University

Nineteenth-century clinicians noted that the treatment of the addict was difficult because they had to treat the "cravings of the mind," as well as "cravings of the body." More recently, researchers have similarly distinguished between "psychological cravings" and "physiological cravings," or "mental desires" and "physical desires" for drugs. Siegel will describe the ways in which learning contributes to addiction.

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