News Center

News from the Reed College public affairs office

Search: or

Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


Media Contact

Beth Sorensen
Office of Communications
503/777-7574
beth.sorensen@reed.edu


<I>FRAMING AMERICA'S LANDSCAPE: PAINTINGS FROM THE ADDISON GALLERY OF AMERICAN ART </I>COMING TO COOLEY GALLERY

From March 23 through June 19, the Douglas F. Cooley Memorial Art Gallery at Reed College will present Framing the American Landscape: 19th- and 20th-Century Paintings from the Addison Gallery of American Art. The 30 paintings from the collection of the Addison Gallery of American Art are among the gallery's most famous, including works by Winslow Homer, George Inness, Albert Bierstadt, and John Singer Sargent.

The Douglas F. Cooley Memorial Art Gallery is open every day except Monday from noon to 5 p.m. The gallery is in the library at the south side of Reed's campus. The #19 bus stops on Woodstock at the entrance to the campus near the library, and parking is available. For more information, please call 503/777-7790.

The exhibition provides a rare opportunity for visitors to examine the artists' changing perceptions of the landscape and the way that view reflects shifting societal needs and attitudes. Through the Addison's paintings, one can view the ways in which the hand of man has altered the natural landscape and the ways in which the agenda of the artist and his or her time have dictated different choices, perceptions, and results.

The range of artists' perceptions of nature can be found in the contrast between such paintings as an unknown artist's documentation of man's harnessing of land for habitation and food in He That by the Plough Would Thrive, and the depiction of a lone figure pitted against the fury of nature in Winslow Homer's The West Wind. The view of nature documented in Frederic Remington's Midnight, Wolf, a night scene of un-peopled wilderness, stands in opposition to the urgency and sheer force of George Inness's The Coming Storm. These paintings provide extraordinary insights into the shifting relationships of man and the American environment.