International Student Services

Division of Student Services

Summer Experience Award

The Summer Experience Award offers Reed students on an F-1 visa the opportunity to complement their academic studies with a summer internship focused on an area of interest and possible future employment. The award was created to provide international students on F-1 visas with off-campus experiences that would typically be unattainable because of work restrictions. This year’s Summer Experience Award will be granted to at least three students, each receiving a maximum of $3750 to cover their expenses while participating in an unpaid internship.

Click here to download the SEA Application 2014

Requirements for Receiving Award

  • Student must be attending Reed on an F-1 visa at the time the award is made

  • Student must be a rising sophomore, junior, or senior at Reed in the summer of 2014

  • Awards will be made only for unpaid internships

  • Internship must be for a minimum of eight weeks of work of at least 20 hours per week

  • Internship must be in the United States

  • Students selected to receive the award will share their experience with the Reed community in the fall of 2014, including oral presentations and a written statement

  • Past recipients of the award must wait one year to re-apply and are not eligible in consecutive years

Timeline

9th Dec Info Session, 4-5pm, GCC 103

29th Jan Info Session, 4-5pm, GCC 103

10th Mar Application Deadline, 5pm

12-24th Mar Application Review by committee

28th Mar Decision notification

Past Recipients:

The 2013 Summer Experience Award Recipients

Yuan Xue '14

sea_yuan

Country Hong Kong, PRC

Major Biology

 

Bio I grew up in Guangzhou, China until the age of nine when I went to Isehara-shi in Japan and attended local elementary school for two years. My family then moved to Hong Kong and I had been there until I was sixteen and decided to attend high school in Portland, Oregon on my own. I have been in Portland for seven years now and I have come to treasure it as my second home. When I am not busy moving across the globe, I enjoy weight training in the gym, scuba diving under the sea, and harmless merry-making with friends.

My SEA Story: I have strong interests in biology science research, and I have always been eager to learn more about different methods and technologies to answer questions that I have in mind about life system. I was both honored and glad to be a recipient of this year’s SEA, which funded my research visit at a Bioengineering lab in Stanford University. I worked under the mentorship of a brilliant graduate student in the lab to develop RNA-based device that would allow reversible control of cell cycle progression through small molecules. The development of this device is significant as cell cycle regulation (or its dysregulation) has a significant role to play in carcinogenesis, cell fate determination, and the efficiency of DNA transfection/integration. The development of this device would potentially open doors for new research studies that were previously challenging to conduct. Specifically for my project, I received training on molecular cloning using Gibson Assembly, flow cytometry assay and analysis of mammalian cells expressing fluorescence-tagged proteins, and cell cycle assay using propidium iodide. On top of the laboratory training I received, I also became well acquainted with many of my co-workers in the laboratory whose friendly personalities and admirable work ethics made my research visit all the more enriching. The SEA enabled me to undergo this invaluable experience which confirmed my passion in conducting scientific research, and I intend to pursue graduate study for further training in the future.

sea_suhai

Suhai Yehuza '16

Country Ghana

Major Physics

Bio I am from Ghana and an aspiring physics major. I am very passionate about soccer and the ocean.

My SEA Story: The SEA gave me the opportunity to spend last summer studying Amphiphilic Polymers at the University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez. It was a very stimulating experience to work with experiences researchers on the synthesis and characterization of polymers that mimic protein fibril formation. I had the pleasure to work with an experienced team of researchers in the university's chemical engineering labs. This experience and exposure to the use and operation of several lab equipments have helped shaped my interest in the engineering field and my possible major here at Reed.

Jason Htet Lin Thu '14

sea_jason

Country Myanmar (Burma)

Major Economics

 

Bio I came from Yangon, Myanmar (Burma) in 2010 to start my academic life at Reed. I am a strong supporter of the International Student Service's work and currently an  InterConnect mentor for four amazing first-year students. My interests and passions include economic development, data analysis, personal development, calligraphy, and theology. I aspire to become an impactful business person.

My SEA Story: I worked as a business outcomes analyst for MicroMentor Program (http://www.micromentor.org/), a subsidiary of Mercy Corps, in Portland, Oregon. The Program provides an online platform for small business owners across the US to meet business mentors and develop their businesses through the mentors' support and suggestions. My role as a business outcomes analyst is to collect and analyze the information on how the mentoring relationships have helped the small business owners and what we can improve in our service. The results are wonderful - suggesting that mentoring and success of the small businesses are greatly correlated. I enjoyed the internship very much because not only I learned valuable professional and technical skills but also I had a wonderful supervisor (Loren Guerriero) and a great team. Definitely it is a fulfilling project to work on and satisfying environment to work in. I am bringing my skills and experiences from this internship into my thesis project as well as my career development beyond Reed.

sea_sandesh

Sandesh Adhikary '15

Country Nepal

Major Physics

Bio Over my two years at Reed, and especially this summer,  I have thoroughly enjoyed living in one of the quirkiest city I’ve ever been in with some of the nicest people I've ever met. I have really enjoyed exploring the great food around Portland and also experimenting with cooking myself. In the future, I can see my interests in Physics, Education and Engineering to name a few, leading me towards a career in research (or hopefully some kind of junction of all of them).

My SEA Story: With the help of the SEA grant, I was able to intern at the Lab of Nanoelectronics at Portland State University. I had the opportunity to contribute in research to find alternative designs for secondary (rechargeable) batteries as opposed to the conventional Li-ion, Ni-Cd or Lead acid ones. The project was aimed at analyzing and optimizing the charge/discharge capacities of different combinations of electrode and electrolyte material. Specifically, we worked on characterizing the electrochemical properties of Calcium and Sodium ions when used within our battery system in an attempt to build robust, cost-effective batteries using chemicals that are easily accessible and less toxic. I really enjoyed working at the lab and plan on continuing my involvement in the project. Apart from teaching me invaluable skills, this summer’s experience has also helped me shape what I might want out of my career in Physics. 

The 2012 Summer Experience Award Recipients

Ha

 

 

Ha Nguyen '15

Country Vietnam

Major Biochemistry

Bio I grew up in Hanoi, Vietnam and lived in Maine for a while before coming to Reed. My hobbies are skateboarding, snowboarding and playing the guitar. I have long been aspiring to become a surgeon.  

My SEA Story: With the funding from the SEA, I was able to work at the Portland Veteran Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) as a research assistant in an immunology lab last summer. The lab focused on examining and developing a potential immunotherapy for multiple sclerosis (MS) called recombinant T-cells receptor ligand (RTL). My main project was to assess the effect of RTL on the complement pathway in antigen-presenting cells and T-cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples of MS patient. I was also trained to handle mice, prepare and process cell samples, and scan for protein expressions using fancy equipments. In the end of the summer, I concentrated on reproducing a construct in the RTL called the α1 domain, as it appeared to induce the most significant effects on EAE (the mice version of MS) and MS. In general, the internship taught me so much about immunology and biomedical research, as well as sharpened my knowledge and laboratory skills.

amanuel

 

 

Amanuel Melesse Tafessu '14

Country Ethiopia

Major biochemistry/molecular biology

Bio I was born and raised in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa. I have enjoyed my time in Portland (has it been 2 years already?!) and I hope to become a researcher.

My SEA Story: The summer experience award allowed me to explore the world of medical research through an internship at CROET, a research center that is part of the Oregon Health and Science University. I had the pleasure of working with a team of researchers peeking into the biochemical puzzle behind Alzheimer’s disease using a fruit fly model. I found the work to be very exciting and left the internship armed with techniques and methods which are generally applicable in biological research. I also got a taste of (and developed a taste for) fulltime lab work. As legal restrictions on payment to students on F-1 visa status would have precluded my participation in the internship program, the SEA made it possible for me to gain this valuable experience.


Huy Nguyen '14

sea_huy

Country Vietnam

Major Physics

Bio I was born and grew up in Saigon, Vietnam and attended high school in Singapore. I’m currently a senior physics major, doing a thesis in condensed matter theory. In my thesis I will be studying various properties of the Hubbard model using auxiliary field-based quantum Monte Carlo methods. On campus I work as a senior helpdesk consultant for the Computer User Services, one-on-one tutor and grader in physics. I also hold a Senior Operator license at the Reed Research Reactor. Outside academics, I enjoy reading about law, public policy, economics and investigative journalism. My hobbies include photography and biking.

My SEA Story: The funding from SEA allows me to attend the physics REU program at the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, VA. I studied and made visualizations of a few Quantum Monte Carlo methods, a class of algorithms that use stochastic processes to simulate quantum mechanical systems. Quantum mechanics is probabilistic in nature and so all physical properties must be calculated using integrals. The fundamental problem here is that quantum systems have a very high number of dimensions which makes deterministic integrals computationally infeasible (think exponential complexity). This is especially true for strongly interacting systems because we cannot use mean field approximations ("divide-and-conquer" if you will). Monte Carlo method allows us more efficient calculation of these integrals at the cost of some statistical uncertainty (which we try to minimize) due to our sampling of the space. Pretty smooth sailing up to this point but before Monte Carlo calculation of properties can be done though, random walks must be used to propagate the wavefunctions through time and this is where things get stormy e.g. the fermion sign problem that requires more clever methods. These methods, however, can be quite opaque to beginners (some of them even occur in abstract spaces instead of position space) and I hope my visualizations will help newcomers more quickly get a sense of how these algorithms work. At the time I just finished sophomore year so I had to wrap my head around some advanced quantum mechanics (e.g. second quantization), statistical mechanics etc but overall I found it delightful to see how researchers pull together ideas from many seemingly unrelated areas of math and physics to solve a particular problem. During the REU I also attended a 7-week machine shop course and many seminars, visited the nearby colonial area several times and went on 2 ropes courses.

The 2011 Summer Experience Award Recipients

Amzar

 

 

 

Amzar Faiz '13

Country Malaysia

Major Economics 

Bio In my free time I enjoy practicing capoeira and yoga as well as venturing out into Portland in search of good food. 

My SEA Story:   I am always up for adventures and new experiences, and it is this drive that has led to my experience in Detroit last summer. After realizing that I did not wish to stay in Portland that summer, and that I wanted to see more of the United Sates, I began searching for opportunities that would help me leave Portland. After searching for awhile, I  came across the Center for Community Based Enterprise (C2BE, www.c2be.org). C2BE is a non-profit based in Detroit whose focus is to research and educate people on ways in which the community may benefiet from cooperating with one another. The Summer Experience Award allowed me to undertake this unpaid internship, by providing me with the resources necessary to sustain myself in Detroit. While I was there, I had the chance to apply my theory based economics which I gained from my classes onto a real world situation. I conducted interviews with locals, met city planners, and experienced firsthand the effects of the recession and international markets on the city. A city which once had almost two million people but now remains with a little less than eight hundred thousand because of various reasons which involve: job losses, bad mortgages, etc. This experience has helped me gain perspective on how my knowledge is applicable in the real world, and without it, my life would be severely lacking.

Elizabeth

 

 

 

Elizabeth Dinkova '13

Country Bulgaria

Major Psychology and Theater

Bio  I love directing, but am also interested in acting and playwriting. My psychology interests focus on creativity research, clinical psychology, and cognitive processes.

My SEA Story:   The award enabled me to complete an internship at the Cognition and development lab at Yale University. I worked as a research assistant with a graduate mentor, with whom I explored the relationship between causality and categorization in a series of studies. The experience helped me become a better researcher and student of psychology. It also informed my understanding of graduate school and the various other paths one could take to pursue a career in psychology.
Photo: Elizabeth standing in front of the psychology building at Yale.


Rukayat

 




Rukayat Taiwo '12

Country Nigeria

Major Biochemistry

Bio  My hobbies are reading and shopping. I aspire to become a medical doctor.

 

My SEA Story:   Last summer, I had the wonderful opportunity of volunteering in the Emergency room and Intensive Care Unit at Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU). In both places, I took part in various clinical research projects with most of them involving the determination of the efficacy of various drugs and new treatment options. Performing my job required interacting with patients and doctors which was not only enjoyable, but also helped improve my professional communication skills. Observing the day-to-day life of a doctor and patient-doctor interactions for a 3 month duration was an invaluable experience which further influenced my decision to apply to medical school. Since these positions were unpaid, I would have been unable to accept them without some financial support to cover my housing and feeding expenses. The funding given to me through the Summer Experience award enabled me take advantage of this opportunity.



My name is Ezwan Amzar Abdullah Faiz and I am current junior from Malaysia who is studying economics and graduating in May of 2012. In my free time I enjoy practicing capoeira and yoga as well as venturing out into Portland in search of good food. I am always up for adventures and new experiences, and it is this drive that has led to my experience in Detroit last summer. After realizing that I did not wish to stay in Portland that summer, and that I wanted to see more of the United Sates, I began searching for opportunities that would help me leave Portland. After searching for awhile, I  came across the Center for Community Based Enterprise (C2BE, www.c2be.org). C2BE is a non-profit based in Detroit whose focus is to research and educate people on ways in which the community may benefiet from cooperating with one another. The Summer Experience Award allowed me to undertake this unpaid internship, by providing me with the resources necessary to sustain myself in Detroit. While I was there, I had the chance to apply my theory based economics which I gained from my classes onto a real world situation. I conducted interviews with locals, met city planners, and experienced firsthand the effects of the recession and international markets on the city. A city which once had almost two million people but now remains with a little less than eight hundred thousand because of various reasons which involve: job losses, bad mortgages, etc. This experience has helped me gain perspective on how my knowledge is applicable in the real world, and without it, my life would be severely lacking.
My name is Ezwan Amzar Abdullah Faiz and I am current junior from Malaysia who is studying economics and graduating in May of 2012. In my free time I enjoy practicing capoeira and yoga as well as venturing out into Portland in search of good food. I am always up for adventures and new experiences, and it is this drive that has led to my experience in Detroit last summer. After realizing that I did not wish to stay in Portland that summer, and that I wanted to see more of the United Sates, I began searching for opportunities that would help me leave Portland. After searching for awhile, I  came across the Center for Community Based Enterprise (C2BE, www.c2be.org). C2BE is a non-profit based in Detroit whose focus is to research and educate people on ways in which the community may benefiet from cooperating with one another. The Summer Experience Award allowed me to undertake this unpaid internship, by providing me with the resources necessary to sustain myself in Detroit. While I was there, I had the chance to apply my theory based economics which I gained from my classes onto a real world situation. I conducted interviews with locals, met city planners, and experienced firsthand the effects of the recession and international markets on the city. A city which once had almost two million people but now remains with a little less than eight hundred thousand because of various reasons which involve: job losses, bad mortgages, etc. This experience has helped me gain perspective on how my knowledge is applicable in the real world, and without it, my life would be severely lacking.