Office for Inclusive Community

Division of Student Services

2012-2013 Events

Saturday, September 8, 2012

Jay Smooth

Eliot Chapel, 8pm

Jay Smooth is the founder of New York City's longest-running hip hop radio program, WBAI's Underground Railroad. He also hosts Ill Doctrine, a hip hop video blog, and writes for the website hiphopmusic.com. This event is open to the public.

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Tuesday Talks

Student Center, 12pm

Obama's Birth Certificate and "Papers Please": National Belonging through State ID? We'll discuss the relationship between state-issued identification documents and political and social inclusion in liberal democratic society. The conversation will be facilitated by LaShandra Sullivan, Scholar in Residence in the Anthropology department. Tuesday Talks happen bimonthly and are open to the entire Reed community. Please bring your lunch and join us!

Let's Talk: Chat with a Counselor at the MRC

Tuesday, 4-5pm, Student Center 110. Weekly beginning October 9, 2012

Beginning Tuesday, October 9, Health & Counseling Center (HCC) counselors will be available at the MRC every Tuesday afternoon to provide easy access to informal, brief, drop-in consultations for stress management. No appointments are necessary, there is no paperwork to complete; visits are first come, first served. Come and relax in the Student Center while you wait to consult with a counselor.

Not sure what to talk about? Here are a few examples:

  • how to support a friend who you're concerned about
  • tips for stress management
  • questions about the Mind Spa at the HCC

Global Citizenship Month

In October and November, the MRC is joining together with SEEDS and International Student Services to explore what it means to be a global citizen. Through campus-wide events, community dialogues, and interactive programs, we will consider dynamics of difference and connection as members of our global community.

Wednesday, October 3, 2012

Eduardo Bonilla-Silva

Vollum Lecture Hall, 4:30pm

Eduardo Bonilla-Silva is a professor of sociology at Duke University. His research areas include racial stratification, social theory, critical race methods, political sociology, Latin America and the Caribbean, and epistemology. His talk is entitled "From Dr. King to President Obama: Racial Vision, Racial Blindness, and Racial Politics in Obamerica." The lecture will be followed by a reception in the lower foyer of Vollum College Center. This event is cosponsored by the sociology department and the office for institutional diversity. The event is open to the public.

Saturday, October 6, 2012

Salar Aghili & Hamnavazan Ensemble, "Traditional Music of Iran"

Eliot Hall Chapel, 6:30pm

Salar Aghili & Hamnavazan Ensemble will showcase contemporary classical music of Iran. This music draws heavily on Persian Sufi poetry, adapting it to contemporary musical styles and instruments. Salar Aghili is one of the foremost vocalist of classical music of his generation. He performs in the Iranian National Orchestra and Symphony. Aghili will be accompanied by two world class maestros from Iran, Hossein Behroozinia (barbat/lute) and Saeed Farajpouri (kamancheh/spike fiddle), as well as by Harir Shariatzadeh (Persian tuned piano) and Behnam Masoumi (tombak/percussion). Cosponsored by the Religion, Music, and Anthropology departments, the Dean for Institutional Diversity, and the Multicultural Resource Center at Reed, and the Andisheh Center, who is organizing the event. Tickets: $40 in advance, online; $45 at the door. Available free to Reed students, faculty, and staff at the Student Activities Office.

Wednesday, October 24, 2012

Jose Antonio Vargas

Kaul Auditorium, 4:30pm

Global Citizenship Month Event

Jose Antonio Vargas is a Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist and founder of DefineAmerican. In 2011, Vargas exposed his personal story in a New York Times Magazine essay, "My Life as an Undocumented Immigrant." His talk, "Define American," will explore the politics of immigration. The lecture will be followed by a reception in Gray Lounge. This event is cosponsored by the David Robinson Memorial Fund for Human Rights, the political science department, and the multicultural resource center. The event is open to the public.

Tuesday, October 30, 2012

Tuesday Talks

Student Center, 12pm

Global Citizenship Month Event

We'll discuss Third Culture Kids, which generally refers to individuals who spend a significant part of their developmental years outside their parents' culture. Tuesday Talks happen bimonthly and are open to the entire Reed community. Please bring your lunch and join us!

Tuesday, November 13, 2012

Tuesday Talks

Student Center, 12pm

Come discuss current events and ideas for dealing with issues of privilege and discrimination. Tuesday Talks happen bimonthly and are open to the entire Reed community. Please bring your lunch and join us!

Thursday, November 15, 2012

International Engagement Panel

Vollum Lounge, 6pm

Global Citizenship Month Event

Join us for a discussion about opportunities to learn and work outside of the U.S. The panel will include faculty, staff, students, and alumni, who will answer questions and share stories about their own experiences.

Tuesday, November 27, 2012

Tuesday Talks

Student Center, 12pm

Come discuss current events and ideas for dealing with issues of privilege and discrimination. Tuesday Talks happen bimonthly and are open to the entire Reed community. Please bring your lunch and join us!

February 2013

Aspirational Prayer Flags Project

Reed campus - outside location

The goal of the project, a partnership between SEEDS, the Multicultural Resource Center, Sexual Assault Prevention and Response, International Student Services, Residence Life, and the Peer Health Advocates, is to hear directly from the Reed community about what our campus needs and what we should strive to become. The project aims to provide education about the history of Tibetan prayer flags and their meaning, and to use prayer flags in a culturally appropriate way to gather the community's aspirations for the New Year.

Tuesday, February 5, 2013

Tuesday Talks: Aspirational Prayer Flags Project

Student Center, 12pm

Tuesday Talks happen bimonthly and are open to the entire Reed community. Please bring your lunch and join us for an hour of conversation!

Friday, February 15, 2013

Bruce Western: "Mass Incarceration and the Prospects for Reform" 

Vollum Lecture Hall, 6pm

Bruce Western is Professor of Sociology and Director of the Malcolm Wiener Center for Social Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. Western's recent work has focused on the link between social inequality and the growth of the prison and jail population in the United States. He finds that the penal system has become a common presence in the lives of poor Americans, with lasting effects on their life chances. As a quantitative social scientist, Western has also contributed to the use of Bayesian statistics in sociology. Cosponsored by the Sociology department and the multicultural resource center.

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

Tuesday Talks

Student Center, 12pm

Tuesday Talks happen bimonthly and are open to the entire Reed community. Please bring your lunch and join us for an hour of conversation!

Thursday, February 21, 2013

Marti Newland: Artist Talk

Psychology 105, 4:30pm

Opera singer and ethnomusicologist Marti Newland will give a talk that draws on her fieldwork at Fisk University, a historically black university in Nashville, Tennessee. She will highlight the voice as a mechanism of speaking and singing and as a site of mediation for ideological, discursive, embodied, and affective constructions of blackness. Newland's visit is supported by the Office for Institutional Diversity's New Scholars Series, the Music department, and the multicultural resource center.

Friday, February 22, 2013

Marti Newland: Recital

Eliot Chapel, 7:30pm

Opera singer and ethnomusicologist Marti Newland will give a talk that draws on her fieldwork at Fisk University, a historically black university in Nashville, Tennessee. She will highlight the voice as a mechanism of speaking and singing and as a site of mediation for ideological, discursive, embodied, and affective constructions of blackness. Accompanied by pianist Artis Wodehouse, Newland will give a vocal recital. Newland's visit is supported by the Office for Institutional Diversity's New Scholars Series, the Music department, and the multicultural resource center.

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Tuesday Talks: Renn Fayre Theme

Student Center, 12pm

Tuesday Talks happen bimonthly and are open to the entire Reed community. Please bring your lunch and join us for an hour of conversation!

Tuesday, March 5, 2013

Tuesday Talks: Migrant Labor in Oregon

Student Center, 12pm

Tuesday Talks happen bimonthly and are open to the entire Reed community. Please bring your lunch and join us for an hour of conversation!

Tuesday, March 12, 2013

Tuesday Talks: Body Positivity and Intersections of Race and Ethnicity

Student Center, 12pm

Tuesday Talks happen bimonthly and are open to the entire Reed community. Please bring your lunch and join us for an hour of conversation!

Tuesday, March 19, 2013 and Wednesday, March 20, 2013

MRC Alternative Spring Break: Migrant Labor in Oregon

The MRC will lead a two-day immersion trip to explore the issue of migrant labor in Oregon. Participants will learn from a migrant farmworkers union, business owners, community leaders, and social justice advocates. For details and application instructions, please contact the MRC.  

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

Tuesday Talks: Multiracial Identity

Student Center, 12pm

Tuesday Talks happen bimonthly and are open to the entire Reed community. Please bring your lunch and join us for an hour of conversation!

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

Vine Deloria Jr. Lecture Series: More Than Just A Trend

Eliot Chapel, 4:30pm

The theme for this year's sixth annual Vine Deloria Jr. lecture is the cultural appropriation of Native Americans in the twenty-first century. The lecture series honors its namesake's memory by recognizing the work of Native American scholars whose intellectual pursuits reflect the spirit and commitment exhibited by Deloria. Cosponsored by the Office for Institutional Diversity and the multicultural resource center.

Tuesday, April 2, 2013

Tuesday Talks: Imperialism and White Savior Complex

Student Center, 12pm

Tuesday Talks happen bimonthly and are open to the entire Reed community. Please bring your lunch and join us for an hour of conversation!

Tuesday, April 9, 2013

Tuesday Talks: Class Dynamics at Reed

Student Center, 12pm

Tuesday Talks happen bimonthly and are open to the entire Reed community. Please bring your lunch and join us for an hour of conversation!

Thursday, April 11, 2013

The Untitled Kondabolu Brothers Project

Vollum Lecture Hall, 8:00pm

The Untitled Kondabolu Brothers Project (UKBP) is a live comedy talk show starring Hari and Ashok Kondabolu. The brothers will present a night of mostly improvised banter and a carefully prepared Powerpoint presentation. Past topics have included: Peak Oil Theory, cultural appropriation, the Illuminati, Blipsters, police brutality, and Ashton Kutcher. The show is done regularly in New York City and has included such guests as W. Kamau Bell, Wyatt Cenac, and Aasif Mandvi. They are also starting a new podcast this year called "The Untitled Kondabolu Brothers Podcast."

Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Tuesday Talks: Racial Humor

Student Center, 12pm

Tuesday Talks happen bimonthly and are open to the entire Reed community. Please bring your lunch and join us for an hour of conversation!

2011-2012 Events

Saturday, August 27, 2011

-ism Facilitated Conversations at New Student Orientation

10 a.m. and 11 a.m., Eliot Hall Chapel

Students will join together to discuss privilege, power, and social justice and how all of these issues affect our community. The conversations will be directed by student facilitators. This event is a follow up to Sam Offer's powerful talk about creating inclusive communities.

Friday, September 9, 2011

Das Racist

8 p.m., Kaul Auditorium

Das Racist is coming...need we say more??? Piloted by @heems, KOOL A.D., and The Honorable Prophet Dapwell, Das Racist is a hip-hop art project/science experiment/Ponzi scheme. Their goal is to make a million American dollars. Das Racist takes on issues of class and race with humor, delectable rhymes, and delicious beats...don't doubt their ability to rock the party all night long! Das Racist is about to drop the album Relax and will head out on their national Relax Tour starting September 12 in New York City. This event is alcohol/substance free and is only open to the Reed community (students, staff, faculty, and alumni) and their guest; ID required.

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Tuesday Talks

12p.m., Student Center

Topic of the week: The implementation of the repeal of the U.S. military policy known as Don't Ask, Don't Tell. The U.S. military will for the first time in history allow gays and lesbians to serve openly in the armed forces. Bring a friend and bring your lunch for an hour of conversation!

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Tuesday Talks

12p.m., Student Center

Topic of the week: The Next 100 Years of Multiculturalism at Reed. Bring a friend and bring your lunch for an hour of conversation!

Wednesday, September 28, 2011

Career Journeys featuring Dr. Alexandra (Alex) Hrycak, Associate Professor of Sociology &
Dr. Bruce Smith, Associate Dean of Students for Student and Campus Life

12p.m., Gray Lounge, Kaul Auditorium

RSVP REQUIRED by Monday, September 26, 2 p.m. FIRM

Welcome to Career Journeys, a periodic program cosponsored by career services and the multicultural resource center. Faculty members speak about the paths they take, sharing their aspirations, discoveries, and inspirations along the way. Hearing from others about how their lives and work unfolded can motivate, inform, and encourage you.

Alexandra Hrycak (Ph.D., University of Chicago) joined the Department of Sociology at Reed College in 1998. She teaches courses on social movements, political sociology, feminist activism, the sociology of culture, and the collapse of communism in Eastern Europe. Her research investigates the role women have played as activists in the democratization of post-communist countries, Ukraine in particular.  Her work has appeared in a range of journals including the American Journal of Sociology, East European Politics and Societies, Women's Studies Quarterly, Problems of Post-Communism. She also has contributed to a number of edited collections on activism and democratization.

Bruce Smith (Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley) currently is Associate Dean of Students for Student and Campus Life at Reed College and works with students, staff, and faculty to develop co-curicular engagement opportunities to Reed's students and other community members. Prior to this position Bruce was Assistant Dean of Student Services for Inclusion, Engagement, and Success at Reed, where he worked with Reed students, staff, and faculty to encourage the development of inclusive learning communities, as well as programming that challenges community members to reflect on their identities and cultural practices.

Tuesday, October 4, 2011

Tuesday Talks

12p.m., Student Center

Topic of the week: Multicultural Leadership Retreat debrief. Bring a friend and bring your lunch for an hour of conversation!

Friday, October 7, 2011

Open House - Multicultural Resource Center and Student Activities Office

1p.m. - 3.p.m., Student Center

Join the MRC and SAO for free food and information about our events and the many opportunities to get involved!

Monday and Tuesday, October 10 and 11, 2011

Tim Miller

6p.m. - 7p.m., Workshop October 10, Mainstage Theatre
7:30p.m. - 9:00p.m., Performance and Discussion October 11, Mainstage Theatre

Tim Miller is an internationally acclaimed performance artist and one of the members of the "NEA 4." Since 1999, Tim Miller has focused his creative and political work on marriage equality and addressing the injustices facing lesbian and gay couples in America. He is also a co-founder of two of the most influential performance spaces in the United States: Performance Space 122 on Manhattan's Lower East Side and Highways Performance Space in Santa Monica, CA. Tim Miller will perform Glory Box, a funny, sexy, and politically charged exploration of same-sex marriage and the struggle for immigration rights for lesbian and gay bi-national couples. The October 10 workshop with students is by invitation only. The October 11 performance is first-come, first-served and is open to the public.

Tuesday, October 11, 2011

Tuesday Talks

12p.m., Student Center

Topic of the week: Occupy Portland. Bring a friend and bring your lunch for an hour of conversation!

Thursday, October 13, 2011

"Traumatized Citizenship: The New Media of Multicultural Life in America"

Presented by Brian Axel, Ph.D. 

4:30p.m. - 6p.m., Eliot 207
 

About the Presenter: Brian Keith Axel received a Ph.D. in Social Anthropology from the University of Chicago in 1998. He has held positions at several institutions, 
including Emory University, Harvard University, Swarthmore College, Duke University, and Stanford University. Among his publications are two books - The Nation's Tortured Body (Duke UP, 2001) and From the Margins (Duke UP, 2002) - and several articles concerned, in general, with questions about diaspora, Sikh life, violence, gender, fantasy, and desire. Presently he is completing his 
second Ph.D. at the University of California-Santa Cruz. The degree is in Philosophy, and the dissertation title is "On Waking Up." Sponsored by the Anthropology Department.

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Tuesday Talks

12p.m., Student Center

Topic of the week: Protest, revolution, and Libya - Bring a friend and bring your lunch for an hour of conversation!

Wednesday, October 26, 2011

Careers for Queers

Presented by Cheryl Hollatz-Wisely, M.Ed.

4:30p.m. - 6:00p.m., Gray Campus Center, C and D, snacks provided, RSVP by 4 p.m., Tuesday, October 25

Careers for Queers will address how queer identity development, coming out, and heterosexism can impact one's career development. Attendees will gain a better understanding of the issues and concerns of GLBTQ college students as well as ideas to inspire and empower their unique career journey. Cosponsored by the multicultural resource center and career services.

About the Presenter: Cheryl Hollatz-Wisely has been involved in career development and student services work for over 20 years. She holds an M.Ed. from the University of Missouri and focused on career counseling and student affairs. Cheryl has worked at private colleges (Webster University, Anderson University, Marylhurst University) community colleges (St. Louis Community College, Clackamas Community College) and most recently at Portland State University.

Tuesday, November 1, 2011

Tuesday Talks

12p.m., Student Center

Topic of the week: Charitable Giving and Privilege. Bring a friend and bring your lunch for an hour of conversation! Tuesday Talks address issues of identity, inclusion, and current events and are facilitated by MRC interns and other members of the Reed community.

Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Claude Steele

4:30p.m., Eliot Hall Chapel

Claude Steele, dean of the School of Education at Stanford University, will discuss his seminal work on stereotype threat and his book Whistling Vivaldi: How Stereotypes Affect Us and What We Can Do. Steele holds a bachelor's degree from Hiram College and doctorate from Ohio State University. He served as the twenty-first provost of Columbia University and has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Education, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. His book Whistling Vivaldi provides an essential roadmap for understanding the link between identity and performance, and how those of us involved in education can make significant strides in mitigating the effects of negative stereotypes in our communities. Cosponsored by the office for institutional diversity, multicultural resource center, and student senate.

Tuesday, November 8, 2011

Tuesday Talks

12p.m., Student Center

Topic of the week: Race and Ethnic Studies at Reed. Bring a friend and bring your lunch for an hour of conversation! Tuesday Talks address issues of identity, inclusion, and current events and are facilitated by MRC interns and other members of the Reed community.

Thursday, November 10, 2011

Hari Kondabolu

9p.m., Eliot Chapel

We think it might be the perfect time for a study break. According to the Seattle Times, Hari Kondabolu is "a young man reaching for the hand-scalding torch of confrontational comics like Lenny Bruce and Richard Pryor." Like his comedic heroes, Hari Kondabolu wants to speak truth to power with confrontational and personal material. Unlike them, he does not want to die of a morphine overdose or set himself on fire. 

Hari Kondabolu has performed on Jimmy Kimmel LiveComedy Central’s Live at Gotham and John Oliver’s New York Standup Show and the 2007 HBO U.S. Comedy Arts Festival. His Comedy Central Presents half-hour television special debuted on the network in February 2011.

Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Tuesday Talks

12p.m., Student Center

Topic of the week: The comedy of Hari Kondabolu. Bring a friend and bring your lunch for an hour of conversation! Tuesday Talks address issues of identity, inclusion, and current events and are facilitated by MRC interns and other members of the Reed community.

Wednesday, November 16, 2011

Career Journeys featuring Nikole Hannah-Jones and Chip Lazenby

12p.m., Gray Lounge, Kaul Auditorium (lunch provided with RSVP)

RSVP required by Thursday, November 9 at 10a.m.

Career Journeys is a 1-hour interview style conversation organized by the multicultural resource center and career services. We ask our community guests to share their path to becoming the professionals they are today, including (but not limited to) important role models and mentors, random curiosities, barriers overcome, and courses of study.

Nikole Hannah-Jones is the Multnomah County reporter for The Oregonian. She joined The Oregonian in 2006 and has written extensively about race and ethnicity. She holds a bachelor's degree in history and African-American studies from the University of Notre Dame and a master's degree in mass communication from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Chip Lazenby is County Attorney for Multnomah County. He has a long career of Oregon public service, including time as general counsel for Portland State University, the Portland Development Commission, and as Legal Counsel to Governor John Kitzhaber during the Governor's first two terms. He assisted the governor with judicial appointments, legal legislative policy and negotiated all the casino gaming compacts with Oregon's nine federally recognized tribes. He holds a bachelor's degree from Harvard University and a Juris Doctorate and Masters of Business Administration from the University of Oregon.

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

Tuesday Talks

12p.m., Student Center

Topic of the week: Penn State & Herman Cain. Bring a friend and bring your lunch for an hour of conversation! Tuesday Talks address issues of identity, inclusion, and current events and are facilitated by MRC interns and other members of the Reed community.

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Tuesday Talks

12p.m., Student Center

Topic of the week: What do disabilities look like at Reed? Bring a friend and bring your lunch for an hour of conversation! Tuesday Talks address issues of identity, inclusion, and current events and are facilitated by MRC interns and other members of the Reed community.

Tuesday, December 6, 2011

Tuesday Talks

12p.m., Student Center

Topic of the week: Famine in Somalia. Bring a friend and bring your lunch for an hour of conversation! Tuesday Talks address issues of identity, inclusion, and current events and are facilitated by MRC interns and other members of the Reed community.

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Multicultural Affairs Reception

4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m., GCC B-C-D, food provided

Join students, staff, faculty, and community organizations for a beginning of the semester reception sponsored by the Multicultural Resource Center.

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Medicine For Melancholy Film Screening

7:00 p.m., Psychology 105

Medicine For Melancholy, directed by Barry Jenkins, was hailed as one of the best films of 2009 by A.O. Scott of the New York Times. "A love story of bikes and one-night stands told through two African-American twenty-somethings dealing with the conundrum of being a minority in a rapidly gentrifying San Francisco." (imdb.com).

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

Barry Jenkins, Lecture and Q&A

6:00 p.m., Eliot Chapel

Barry Jenkins will screen several of his recent short films and discuss his work and career, including his 2009 film Medicine For Melancholy. He is an award-winning filmmaker based in Oakland, CA. After graduating from Florida State University with a B.A. in English and a B.F.A. in Film, he relocated to Los Angeles, where he worked as an assistant to director Darnell Martin on the Oprah Winfrey production Their Eyes Were Watching God. His feature film debut, Medicine for Melancholy, was released in theaters by IFC Films. Other projects include the shorts Tall Enough, A Young Couple, Remigration and Chlorophyl.

Tuesday, March 13, 2012 and Wednesday, March 14, 2012

MRC Spring Training: Immigration

The Multicultural Resource Center will lead a two-day alternative spring break immersion trip (1 day in Portland, 1 day in Tacoma) to explore the issues of immigration and enforcement. Participants will learn from immigration attorneys, community leaders, and social justice advocates. Contact the Multicultural Resource Center for more information.

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Career Journeys

Crystal Williams, Dean for Institutional Diversity and Associate Professor of Creative Writing and Felicia Tripp '96, Deputy Director of the Portland Housing Center

12:00 p.m., GCC-C & D

RSVP REQUIRED by Wednesday, March 14, 10 a.m. FIRM 

Career Journeys is a 1-hour interview style conversation organized by the multicultural resource center and career services. We ask faculty and community guests to share their path to becoming the professionals they are today, including (but not limited to) important role models and mentors, random curiosities, barriers overcome, and courses of study. Appointed on July 1, 2011, Crystal Ann Williams is Reed's first dean for institutional diversity. Also an associate professor of creative writing, she is the author of three collections of poetry, most recently Troubled Tongues, winner of the Naomi Long Madgett Poetry Award and finalist for the Oregon Book Award. Crystal Williams is the recipient of fellowships and grants from the Oregon Arts Commission, Literary Arts, the MacDowell Arts Colony, and the Barbara Deming/Money For Women Fund. Her poetry has appeared in journals such as The American Poetry Review, Ploughshares, The Sun, The Indiana Review, 5 AM, and Callaloo. She has been a member of the Reed College faculty since 2000.

Felicia Tripp is the Deputy Director of the Portland Housing Center where she oversees operations, administration, resource development and fundraising. Ms. Tripp has been with the Portland Housing Center since 1999 when she joined the Board of Directors. In November 2000, she joined the staff of the Portland Housing Center. During her tenure with the organization, she has been committed to closing the wealth gap in low income communities and at the same time finding creative ways to create economic resiliency within our low income communities.

Prior to the Portland Housing Center, she was the Executive Director of Emergence Foundation, a children and family services foundation. She graduated from Reed College with a B.A. in History. She also participated in Class II of Portland State University Leadership Fellows Program and recently was a member of the Harvard Kennedy School's Achieving Excellence Program.

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Samhita Mukhopadhyay

6:00 p.m., Vollum Lounge

Samhita Mukhopadhyay is a writer, speaker, and technologist residing in Brooklyn, NY. She is the Executive Editor of the popular website Feministing.com and is the author of Outdated: Why Dating is Ruining Your Love Life. She has written for multiple outlets including GOOD MagazineThe NationThe American ProspectAlternet and the Guardian UK. She is also a highly regarded web strategist and has developed and managed the online technology strategies of leading grassroots organizing groups including The Center for Media Justice, The Praxis Project, The New Media Literacy Project and the Media Action Grassroots Network. 

In 2007, she was named a Champion of Sexual Literacy by the National Sexuality Resource Center. Mukhopadhyay is on the board of directors at Sakhi, a New York City based organization committed to the eradication of violence against women with a focus on women of the South Asian diaspora. She has a B.A. from the State University of New York at Albany in Women's Studies and Sociology and an M.A. from San Francisco State in Women and Gender Studies where her research focused on the politics of the feminist blogosphere. 

This event is open to the public and all are welcome to join us.

Wednesday, March 28, 2012

Vine Deloria Jr. Lecture Series

Making the Invisible Visible: The Native American Community in Multnomah County

4:30 p.m., Eliot Chapel, traditional dancing with drum performance and a panel discussion. Reception to follow.

The Reed College campus, the city of Portland, and the surrounding metro area rest on the traditional lands of many Native American tribes. The urban Native American population in Portland is often overlooked, even as this multitribal community experiences rapid growth. The 2012 Vine Deloria Jr. panel discussion offers a dynamic exploration of the experiences of Native Americans in greater Portland. This event is open to the public and all are welcome to join us. 

Performance: Traditional Native American dancing and drumming, performed by members of the Native American Youth & Family Center (NAYA), located in North Portland.

Panel: A discussion among four Native American leaders of the recent Coalition of Communities of Color and Portland State University 2011 report, "The Native American Community in Multnomah County: An Unsettling Profile."

Nichole Maher  
Executive Director, Native American Youth & Family Center (NAYA) 
Tlingit Tribe

Nichole Maher has served as the Executive Director of NAYA for over 10 years and under her leadership the organization has grown tremendously to provide wrap-around, culturally specific community services for the Native community in Multnomah County. Maher currently serves on the boards of: Portland Schools Foundation, Northwest Health Foundation, Planned Parenthood, Portland Parks & Recreation, National Urban Indian Family Coalition, the National Comcast/NBC Joint Council Board and the Oregon Education Investment Board.

Laura L. Harris 
Executive Director and CEO, Americans for Indian Opportunity (AIO) 
Comanche

Laura Harris has worked for Americans for Indian Opportunity for the past 20 years. Prior to joining AIO, Harris worked at the Smithsonian's Office for Institutional Initiatives and was one of the original staff of the National Museum of the American Indian Campaign Office. President Clinton appointed Harris to serve as a senior consultant to the President's Initiative on Race. Harris is the founding Chair of the New Mexico Native American Democratic Caucus and elected secretary of the Toyah Band of Comanche. 

Sherry Addis  
Portland Area Office Supervisor, Confederated Tribes of Siletz 
Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians

Sherry Addis has worked for her tribe since 2008 as the Portland Area Office Supervisor. Addis oversees a wide range of social service programs for Siletz tribal members as well as enrolled members of other federally recognized tribes, Alaskan Natives, and Hawaiian Natives. Previously Addis worked for the City of Portland, Transportation Bureau for 18 years and for the Port of Portland for five years. 

Matt Morton (Panel Moderator) 
Deputy Executive Director, Native American Youth & Family Center (NAYA) 
Squaxin Island Tribe

Matt Morton is the Deputy Executive Director of the Native American Youth & Family Center (NAYA). Previously, he served as the Deputy Director for the National Indian Child Welfare Association (NICWA). Morton has been actively involved in the Portland community and he was elected to the Portland Public Schools Board in 2011.

Saturday, April 7, 2012

Reedies For Somalia Fundraiser

5:00 p.m., Kaul Auditorium

This event will raise funds for Islamic Relief USA's food aid program in Somalia. The event includes a silent auction, music and dance performances, and traditional Somali food. Organized by Reedies For Somalia and cosponsored by the multicultural resource center and student senate.

Monday, April 23, 2012

Iduvina Hernandez

4:30 p.m., Eliot 314

Iduvina Estalinova Hernández Batres, a Guatemalan journalist and human rights defender, will lecture on the impact of powerful retired military officers implicated in crimes against humanity on national security policy. She will also discuss the recent moves to criminalize indigenous activists defending their right to their ancestral lands.

She was born in Guatemala City, where she received an education which emphasized a spirit of service to humanity. In the late 1970s, she was actively involved in a student movement at the University of San Carlos. In 1984, she was forced into exile in Mexico. She is currently the Director of the Association for the Study and Promotion of Security in Democracy, a non-governmental organization that works to improve security, reduce impunity, and improve the democratic process in Guatemala.

This event is cosponsored by the Spanish department, the multicultural resource center, and the office for institutional diversity.

2010 Events

February, 2010

Black History Month

 This year's program includes two lectures in February, the first by renowned scholar of black political thought Melissa Harris-Lacewell on February 19 and the second by historian and black power expert Peniel E. Joseph on February 27. Two ROMP! events are also cross-listed with Black History Month programming. All events are free and open to the public unless noted otherwise.

  • Melissa Harris-Lacewell
    7 p.m., Friday, February 19, Vollum lecture hall
    Melissa Harris-Lacewell is an associate professor of politics and African American studies at Princeton University. She is the author of the award-winning book Barbershops, Bibles, and BET: Everyday Talk and Black Political Thought (Princeton, 2004) and the forthcoming book Sister Citizen: A Text For Colored Girls Who've Considered Politics When Being Strong Wasn't Enough (forthcoming, Yale University Press). She appears regularly on MSNBC and is a frequent contributor to The Nation online.
  • A Conversation with Imani Winds
    2 p.m., Saturday, February 20, Psychology 105
    Grammy-nominated Imani Winds has carved out a distinct presence in the classical music world. In conjunction with Black History Month, the members of Imani Winds—Valerie Coleman, flute; Toyin Spellman-Diaz, oboe; Mariam Adam, clarinet; Jeff Scott, French horn; and Monica Ellis, bassoon—will discuss their musical tribute to iconic African American entertainer Josephine Baker. The conversation, part of ROMP! and moderated by Reed professor of music Mark Burford, will explore the wind quintet as a distinctive vehicle for both players and composers. Portraits of Josephine Baker will be performed as part of the evening’s concert program.
  • ROMP! Chamber Music Northwest Concert: Imani Winds
    7:30 p.m., Saturday, February 20, Kaul Auditorium
    Imani Winds, hailed as “nothing less than the future of the wind quintet” by the Washington Post, presents a program influenced by tango and Cuban music. Tickets: $10–48; call 503/294-6400, or visit Chamber Music Northwest.
  • Peniel E. Joseph
    7 p.m., Saturday, February 27, Vollum lecture hall
    Peniel E. Joseph is a professor of Africana studies at Brandeis University and an expert on the black radical tradition, pan-Africanism, black social movements, and African American feminism. Joseph's first two books, Waiting 'Til the Midnight Hour: A Narrative History of Black Power in America and The Black Power Movement: Rethinking the Civil Rights-Black Power Era, were published in 2006. He is currently working on his next two major research projects—A World of Our Own: Black Intellectuals and the Pan-African Dream and Any Day Now: African American Historical Criticism.

January 18, 2010

Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service

All Day, Start at University of Portland Chiles Center

Reed is partnering with other local colleges and universities on a city wide Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service. The goal is to recruit 1,000 students to serve at 30-50 schools, non-profits and other community-based agencies. Before going out into the community, everyone will come together at the University of Portland Chiles Center, to share the vision for the day, have a time of remembrance for and learn about MLK Jr., and get excited to go out and serve.

2009 Events

November 3, 2009

damali ayo

7 p.m., Vollum Lounge

Lecture: “I can fix racism”

damali ayo, author, artist, and comedian, speaks about race, art, and eco-living. Her award-winning work has been shown at galleries across the world. damali and her work have been featured in over 100 publications world-wide includingHarpers, the Village Voice, Salon.com, the Washington PostSeattle TimesChicago TribuneRedbook, and CSPAN2's Book TV. 

Some of her well known works are How to Rent a Negro and Panhandling for Reparations. Her forthcoming book is entitled Obasmistan! Land Without Racism.

September 24, 2009

Vijay Prashad

7 p.m., Eliot chapel

Vijay Prashad is the author of eleven books, including The Darker Nations: A People's History of the Third World, which was picked by the Asain American Writers' Workshop as the best nonfiction book of 2008.

September 17, 2009

Jackson Katz

7:30 p.m., Vollum lecture hall

Jackson Katz is an educator, author and filmmaker who has long been recognized as one of America's leading anti-sexist male activists. Katz is internationally recognized for his groundbreaking work in gender violence prevention education with men and boys.