Diversity at Reed

Vine Deloria Jr.

Vine Deloria Jr. Lecture Series

Vine Deloria Jr., a preeminent intellectual of the 20th century, brought attention to the importance of place and traditions within Native American communities. He was the author of more than 20 works and was an active leader for numerous Native American institutions. After Deloria died in 2005, Reed students, faculty, and staff created the Vine Deloria Jr. lecture series to honor his memory. Inaugurated in 2007, the series recognizes the work of Native American scholars whose intellectual pursuits reflect the spirit and commitment of Deloria.

Winona LaDuke: "Economics for the Seventh Generation"

Monday, March 30, 2015
6:00 p.m.
Kaul Auditorium

Video of Winona LaDuke's talk available here.



 

Winona LaDuke is an Anishinaabekwe (Ojibwe) enrolled member of the Mississippi Band Anishinaabeg. As a graduate of Harvard and Antioch Universities with advanced degrees in rural economic development, LaDuke has devoted her life to protecting the lands and life ways of Native communities. LaDuke is founder and Executive Director of Honor the Earth, a national advocacy group encouraging public support and funding for native environmental groups. With Honor the Earth, she works nationally and internationally on issues of climate change, renewable energy, sustainable development, food systems and environmental justice.

In her own community in northern Minnesota, she is the founder of the White Earth Land Recovery Project, one of the largest reservation based non-profit organizations in the country, and a leader on the issues of culturally-based sustainable development strategies, renewable energy and food systems. In this work, LaDuke also works to protect Indigenous plants and heritage foods from patenting and genetic engineering.

In addition to numerous articles, LaDuke is the author of a number of non-fiction titles including All Our Relations, The Winona LaDuke Reader, Recovering the Sacred: the Power of Naming and Claiming, Food is Medicine: Recovering Traditional Foods to Heal the People and her latest, The Militarization of Indian Country. She has also penned a work of fiction, Last Standing Woman, and a children's book, In the Sugarbush.

For questions email Caitlin Bergeon, Program Manager for Institutional Diversity at: vdj@reed.edu