Diversity at Reed

Bias Incidents and Discriminatory Harassment Resource Guide

Please contact any of the people listed below for guidance in reporting or responding to bias related incidents and/or discriminatory harassment.

Community Safety
Gary Granger
503-771-1112 x.0
grangerg@reed.edu

Office for Institutional Diversity
Mary James
503-517-7888
institutional.diversity@reed.edu

Office for Inclusive Community
Dayspring Mattole
503-777-7518
mattoled@reed.edu

Dean of Students Office
Bruce Smith
503-777-7521
student-services@reed.edu

Dean of the Faculty's Office
Nigel Nicholson
503-517-5546
nnichols@reed.edu

Office of Human Resources
Michelle Valintis
503-777-7705
mvalintis@reed.edu

Reed College is a community governed by an honor principle and committed to fostering a diverse and inclusive living and learning environment (read Reed College's Diversity Statement here). In such a community, all members have the right to work, learn, and live in an environment free of bias and discriminatory harassment. We encourage all community members to help create an environment free of bias and harassment by modeling honorable behavior; discouraging inappropriate behavior in others, and speaking up when one is the target of or witness to discriminatory harassment.


Definition of Discriminatory Harassment
(Excerpts from Reed's DHSM policy)

If you are looking for more information about Title IX and reporting sexual misconduct, please click here.

Discriminatory harassment is unwelcome verbal, written, visual, or physical conduct that is derogatory, insulting and/or intimidating and that is based on or motivated by an individual’s or group’s actual or perceived affiliation with protected classes or categories. (See section II of the DHSM policy for a list of protected classes or categories).

Discriminatory harassment is both unlawful and violates this policy if it creates a hostile environment. Harassment creates a hostile environment if it is sufficiently severe, pervasive, or persistent that it either (1) denies, interferes with, or limits a person’s ability to participate in or benefit from the College’s programs or activities; or (2) creates a learning, working, or living environment that a reasonable person would consider intimidating, hostile, or offensive.

Discriminatory harassment can be carried out by various means, from the use of offensive or intimidating references to a protected class (such as with slurs, epithets, or offensive stereotypes) to outright threats, and by way of various mechanisms or media, whether verbal, non-verbal, written, visual, electronic or other. Discriminatory harassment includes disparaging, degrading, or abusive words, phrases, or generalizations which are directed at an individual or group based on their actual or perceived affiliation with a protected class, and for which there is no reasonable academic, educational or artistic justification.


Report Discriminatory Harassment or a Bias Incident