Reed College Catalog

Ann T. Delehanty

Early modern prose, classical theatre, medieval literature, philosophy and literature, francophone literature of the Caribbean and Africa.

Hugh M. Hochman

Twentieth-century French poetry and prose, theories of the lyric, philosophy of language.

Luc A. Monnin

Eighteenth-century French literature and culture, history and theory of language, history of ideas, computer theory, visual arts.

Jeannine Murray-Román

Twentieth-century Francophone literature, Caribbean literature and performance, interart aesthetics, theories of translation, new media and digital writing.

William E. Ray

French narrative from the seventeenth century to the present, cultural theory, theories of reading, aesthetic theory. On leave spring 2013. On leave spring 2013.

Catherine A. Witt

Nineteenth-century literature, art and history, contemporary poetry, theatre, cinema. On sabbatical 2012–13.

Students majoring in French focus on acquiring both a critical appreciation of French literature and the ability to express themselves in the spoken and written language. In keeping with Reed’s general educational goals, students are expected to broaden their preparation by pursuing work in humanities, other literatures, and the fine arts.

The members of the French department cover a wide range of literary interests and critical attitudes. The course offerings, organized mostly by genre, cover the important periods and movements in French literature.

In addition to the general course offerings, the department offers seminars on special topics and can arrange independent studies. Recent seminar topics have included contemporary French narrative, French feminist theory, surrealism in literature and the other arts, Rousseau, Balzac, Flaubert, Baudelaire, and history and French cinema.

Most classes range in size from 10 to 15 students and are conducted primarily in French.

Prerequisites

Any student who wishes to enroll in a French course at any level and who has not studied French at Reed College must take the placement examination given every year during orientation. Entering students who place out of second-year language (French 210) will be advised to enroll in French 320 or another 300-level course with consent of the instructor.

For Majors
Students who wish to major in French and who do not have prior experience in the language can pursue the major by completing French 110 and 210 during their first two years at Reed, or elsewhere. During their last two years they must complete all the course requirements for the major listed below.

For Nonmajors
Students wishing to fulfill the Division of Literature and Languages requirement for third-year study in a foreign literature can do so by both showing proficiency at the level of French 210 and then completing two 300-level courses numbered higher than French 320.

French House
The French House on campus functions not only as a residence hall, but also as the center for a variety of extracurricular activities, including film evenings and social and cultural events, as well as gatherings with students and faculty from the entire Reed College community.

Language Scholars
Each year, Reed hosts two visiting language scholars from France. They provide contact with a native speaker and assist the department in academic and cultural matters.

Study Abroad
The French department encourages its majors to spend some time abroad, and to that end it has instituted exchange programs in France with the Université de Rennes II and several campuses of the Université de Paris. The work a student completes abroad in these approved programs is credited toward the Reed degree, and students on financial aid may apply their aid toward the costs.

Requirements for the Major

  1. A minimum of six units in literature at the 300 and 400 level, at least two of which must be prior to the nineteenth century.
  2. Ability to write French at the equivalent of French 320.
  3. French 470.

Recommended but not required:

  1. French 320 is strongly advised.
  2. Humanities 210 and/or 220.

French 110 - First-Year French

Full course for one year. A study of elements of grammar, speaking, and reading. Conference.

French 210 - Second-Year French

Full course for one year. Revision of grammar and elementary composition; readings in philosophy, lyric poetry, novel, and theatre. Prerequisite: French 110 or equivalent. Conference.

French 320 - Stylistics and Composition

Full course for one year. This course is designed to help students develop strong written and oral skills in French and to familiarize them with the critical uses of a rhetorical vocabulary. Through frequent discussions of regular writing and close-reading assignments we will explore ways to frame a wide range of questions pertaining to French literature from the Middle Ages to the contemporary Francophone novel. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement exam. Conference. Fulfills the Group D requirement.

French 331 - French Literature and Culture of the Middle Ages

Full course for one semester. This course examines the literature of eleventh- to fifteenth-century France, with an emphasis on the cultural milieu (social, artistic, religious, philosophical, political) in which the texts appeared. We examine various representations of the chivalric hero and his (or her!) relationship to society. We ask: must all knights be errant? Is the idea of a courtly society an oxymoron? How does the law of the individual translate to the law of the social group? Can women be heroes? Works include: the Chanson de Roland, the Lais of Marie de France, romances of Chrétien de Troyes, several short chansons de geste, farces, and satires. Discussion in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement exam. Conference.

Not offered 2012-13.

French 332 - Early Modern French Literature and Culture

The Early Modern Novel
Full course for one semester. This course will examine the rise of the novel in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. We will ask what differentiates the novel from other narrative forms and seek to determine how novelistic (or proto-novelistic) forms differ from other early modern texts. We will also seek to discern whether the novel offered a forum for social subversion in a way that other literary forms did not. We will ask whether these writers experiment with literary form, narration, and character in order to put social norms into question. The reading list will include Rabelais’ Gargantua, Marguerite de Navarre’s Heptaméron, Cyrano de Bergerac’s Les Etats et empires de la lune, Scarron’s Roman comique, and Mme. De Lafayette’s Zaïde. Discussion in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or equivalent. Conference.

French 333 - The French Enlightenment

Full course for one semester. This course examines the literature of eighteenth-century France, with emphasis on the cultural milieu (social, artistic, religious, philosophical, political) in which the texts appeared. We will examine the emergence of the ideology of reason as it is thematized in texts by Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, D’Alembert, Condillac, Rousseau, and Condorcet. We will look at key notions that define the Enlightenment and ask how new literary forms shape, promote, or question these ideas. We will also examine forms of popular culture that the scientific and philosophical agenda keeps in the shadows and demonizes as superstition, imagination, or foolishness. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement examination. Conference.

Not offered 2012-13.

French 334 - Nineteenth-Century French Literature and Culture

Full course for one semester. Focusing on the topic of imaginaire fantastique, this course looks at the fascination in nineteenth-century literature, music, art and culture with the supernatural and the uncanny. Reading a selection of short stories, poems, literary correspondence, and philological texts from nineteenth-century France, we will examine how various aesthetic, scientific, religious, and spiritualist discourses linked to the supernatural shaped the emergence of new genres, narrative techniques, and literary tropes. Authors studied include major French writers and poets (Nodier, Mérimée, Gautier, Balzac, Nerval, Hugo, Barbey d’Aurevilly, Villiers de L’Isle Adam, and Maupassant) as well as influential “theorists” of the uncanny (E.T.A. Hoffmann, Poe, Freud, and Caillois, among others). Discussion in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement exam.

Not offered 2012-13.

French 342 - Novel from Flaubert to the New Novel: The Collapse of Realism and the Undoing of the Subject

Full course for one semester. The theory and decline of realism in the French novel will be discussed in Flaubert, Proust, Sartre, Robbe-Grillet, and Sarraute. Focusing primarily on the evolution in narrative form from 1850 to 1960, this course will examine the shift in the modern novel from representing social structures or systems objectively to evoking subjectivity and provoking more complex reader-text transactions. Discussion in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement exam. Conference.

French 343 - Contemporary French Fiction

Full course for one semester. This course will examine narrative strategies since the late 1950s and their underlying aesthetic theories. The course will focus on several issues or problems, including the autonomy of the literary text, narrative as a space of encounter between objective reality and the creative imagination, and the construction of the subject through autofiction. How do the formal aspects of prose fiction place into question our experience of the self and the world? To what extent are the self and the world disclosed through narrative, and what is the nature of this process? Readings will include Robbe-Grillet, Perec, Duras, Hébert, Barthes, Modiano, Ernaux, and Condé. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement exam. Conference.

French 351 - Seventeenth-Century French Drama

Full course for one semester. In this course, we will examine several plays by Corneille, Racine, and Molière. We will focus on how authority is established in a society where all authority is in question. We will look at the theatrical representation of kings, sultans, courtiers, nobles, doctors, servants, martyrs, and others in order to consider the various sources of power, authority, and sagacity in a political climate where dissimulation, spectacle, and divertissement often got you further than more traditional means. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement exam. Conference.

French 362 - Francophone African Studies

Full course for one semester. The goals of this course are twofold: first we will explore some of the canonical works produced by African writers during the colonial era and as part of 1960s independence movements as well as new “transnational” African fiction in film and print publication. The second goal is to examine the ways in which relations of global inequity have perpetuated and been transformed over the course of the twentieth and twenty-first century, despite the formal end to colonialism. This course may focus on sub-Saharan African literature and film, and/or film and literature of the Maghreb. Prerequisite: French 210 or equivalent. Conference.

French 363 - Francophone Literature

Full course for one semester. French Writing in the Postcolonies. This course seeks to identify the aesthetic and political specificity of texts that are written in French from the context of France's ex- and current colonies. As we move through various global Francophone spaces, we will be able to compare the polyglossic linguistic situations that distinguish African, Caribbean and Canadian contexts and consider how the geopolitical and historical moments of textual production inflect questions of publication and audience reception. The driving question that motivates this course is how do these various complex political and linguistic contexts affect the production of French literature? Readings will include works by Aimé Césaire, Jacques Stephen Alexis, Assia Djebar, Yambo Ouologuem, and Régine Robin. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement exam. Conference.

Not offered 2012-13.

French 371 - Nineteenth-Century French Poetry and Poetics

Full course for one semester. This course explores the emergence of a new poetic representation of the self in the nineteenth century and follows its development from the contemplative verses of Lamartine to the typographical experimentations of Mallarmé. Through reading a combination of canonical works (by poets of the romantic, Parnassian, and symbolist schools) and popular poetry, students will identify and reflect upon the rhetorical and prosodic innovations that upturned the idea of lyricism in the modern period. Topics include popular culture, the relation between the arts, hermeticism, irony, and modernity. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement exam. Conference.

Not offered 2012-13.

French 381 - Twentieth-Century French Poetry and Poetics

Full course for one semester. This course will focus on poets since Mallarmé and the theoretical, aesthetic, and ethical projects of poetry in the context of modernity. Poets covered will include Apollinaire, Reverdy, Desnos, Eluard, Ponge, Bonnefoy, Guillevic, Réda, and Roubaud. The course will rely on close rhetorical readings in order to found an understanding of lyric poetry in the modern age, focusing on address, theories of performative language, relationships between figurative and literal language, and the materialism-textualism debate. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement exam. Conference.

French 382 - Twentieth-Century French Theatre

Full course for one semester. This course explores a wide spectrum of experimental and theoretical avenues in twentieth-century French theatre. Taking the concept of interprétation as a point of departure, we will examine the various intersections between modern theories of dramaturgy, acting, and stage production with a view to opening up the theatrical space to new modalities of reading. Authors studied include playwrights (Jarry, Apollinaire, Cocteau, Sartre, Beckett, Genet, Koltès, and Novarina) and major theoreticians of avant-garde theatre (Artaud, Grotowski, Brecht, Brooks, et al.). Students will gain a firsthand insight into the problems of staging and performing the theatrical text through in-class readings and by watching excerpts of actual performances. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement exam. Conference.

Not offered 2012-13.

French 400 - Introduction to Literary Theory

See Literature 400 for description.

Literature 400 Description

French 451 - Special Topics in French Literature

Postwar French Cinema
Full course for one semester. This course examines the testimonial function taken on by French cinema in the second half of the twentieth century. Focusing on films that problematize significant trends or crises in this historical period (e.g. the Occupation, the Holocaust, decolonization, the rise of consumer society, student protests in May ’68, etc.), we will discuss what forms of montage, framing, tropes and other audiovisual strategies enable the filmic medium to propose critical alternatives to traditional historical narratives. Additionally, we will read key essays by film critics and theorists pertaining to the commitment of French cinema to politics and ethics. Films viewed will include works by filmmakers Resnais, Ophüls, Bresson, Varda, Godard, Marker, and Eustache. There will be weekly film screenings on Monday nights. Discussion in French. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by placement exam. Conference.

Not offered 2012-13.

French 470 - Thesis

One-half or full course for one semester or one year.

French 481 - Independent Reading

One-half or full course for one semester. Prerequisite: French 210 or demonstration of equivalent ability by examination; approval of instructor and division.