Reed College Catalog

Creative writing courses at Reed are taught as workshops by practicing writers. Students write works of poetry and fictional and nonfictional prose, which are distributed to other participants in the workshop for review and critique. In addition to the workshops, occasional discussions and meetings with visiting writers are part of the program. Students are encouraged to participate in literary events both on and off campus and to create such events of their own.

Admission to creative writing courses requires consent of the instructor based on a writing sample. Creative theses are possible when faculty supervision is available and when the student’s work gains approval from the creative thesis committee.

Creative Writing 201 - Introduction to Creative Writing

The Short Story
Full course for one semester.  In this course students will write short stories, and read the work of their classmates as well as that of published authors.  Close attention will be paid to the narrative strategies used by writers such as Salinger, Hempel, Chekhov, Kawabata, and Diaz to help the students in writing their own fiction.  We will consider these various strategies when reading and responding to the work of  peers. Class sessions will be used for discussion of assigned readings and work in progress. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a writing sample of three to five pages, at least sophomore standing, and consent of the instructor. Conference.

Writing Creatively
Full course for one semester. This genre-free creative writing course is generative in nature and will focus on stimulating creativity. Students will do intensive in-class writing each week but very little “workshopping” in the traditional sense. We will focus on the basics of writing creatively: storytelling, image, rhythm, sound, metaphor, and character. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a writing sample, either prose or poems, and consent of instructor. Conference. Not offered 2009-10.

Creative Writing 207 - Introduction to Creative Nonfiction: The Personal Essay

Full course for one semester. In this workshop students will write personal essays that cover a range of genres (such as memoir, analytic meditation, and portrait); they will also read and discuss published essays and the work of their peers. Class sessions will be used for discussion of assigned readings and work in progress. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a prose writing sample of three to five pages and consent of the instructor. Conference.

Creative Writing 221 - Fiction Studio I: Questions of Narrative

Full course for one semester. In this workshop students will write short stories and read the work of their classmates, as well as that of published authors. Special emphasis will be given to understanding narrative strategies, critically responding to others’ work, and revising one’s own fiction. The exercises provided and the published stories read (such as Kawabata, O’Connor, Hemingway, Joyce, and Munro) will illustrate basic narrative decisions and some strategies used to enhance narrative development. Class sessions will be used for discussion of assigned readings and work in progress. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a writing sample of three to five pages, at least sophomore standing, and consent of the instructor. Conference. Not offered 2009-10.

Creative Writing 224 - Poetry Studio I: Awakenings and Connections

Full course for one semester. According to Lucille Clifton, “Poetry began when somebody walked off a savanna or out of a cave, looked up at the sky with wonder and said, ‘Ah-h-h!’” In this introductory poetry studio students will engage in writing exercises designed to help them strengthen their poetry writing skills. We will read, listen to, and analyze poetry written by nationally recognized authors in an attempt to find a common critical language that we will use while discussing student work. To that end, students will write poetry, both in and out of class, and will workshop that poetry with their peers. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a writing sample of three to five poems and consent of the instructor. Conference. Not offered 2009-10.

Creative Writing 274 - Poetry Studio II: Revision

Full course for one semester. This studio will focus on the craft of revision by concentrating on rhetorical strategies, point of view, logic, tone, subject matter, and the “why” of the poem. Students will be presented with a series of tools with which to tackle the often confounding, mysterious, and very gratifying task of revising poems. Students  should have at least four poems they want to revise on the first day of class as our focus will be on revising current work, not generating new work. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a writing sample of three to five poems by the published deadline and Creative Writing 224. Conference. Not offered 2009-10. 

Creative Writing 321 - Special Topics Studio

Creative Nonfiction
Full course for one semester. This course is designed for students with considerable experience as writers and an interest in the aesthetic and ethical issues involved in the practice of creative nonfiction. The class will read essays from a wide range of writers (Hazlitt, Emerson, Turgenev, E.M. Cioran, Camus, Orwell, Joan Didion, Eldridge Cleaver, Denis Johnson, and others). Class time will be divided between a discussion of reading assignments and a workshop in which the group critiques student essays. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a writing sample of three to five pages, a 200-level creative writing course, at least sophomore standing, and consent of the instructor. May be repeated for credit. Not offered 2009-10. 

Economy
Full course for one semester. This workshop is designed for students with considerable experience in writing short prose. Students will read stories and essays by published authors in order to learn how to manage effects economically, and to write with maximum efficiency and suggestion. Students will write one short piece of prose per week; critically responding to others’ work, and the revision of one’s own stories, will also be emphasized. Class sessions will be used for discussion of assigned readings and work in progress. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a writing sample of three to five pages, one 200-level creative writing course, at least sophomore standing, and consent of the instructor. May be repeated for credit. Conference.

Investigating Narrative Genres
Does the story change if the mode of storytelling changes?  This workshop will examine the question of how the narrative is affected by the use of three types of storytelling:  the personal nonfiction essay, the short story, and the screenplay.  Students will write a piece of nonfiction and follow its adaptation into fiction and then into screenplay.  Students will also read and respond to each other's work, as well as the work of Didion, Hemingway, and A.S. Byatt (including a screen adaptation of her work), among others. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a writing sample of three to five pages, one 200-level creative writing course, at least sophomore standing, and consent of the instructor. May be repeated for credit. Conference.

Linked Short Stories
Full course for one semester. This workshop is designed for students with considerable experience in writing short fiction. Students will read published stories by writers such as Munro, Hemingway, Joyce, Dybek, Diaz, and Porter, that are linked by theme, character, plot, setting, and so on. Our goal will be to understand such connection as a generative device that lends dimension to fictional worlds. Student work will also focus on writing stories that are linked. Special emphasis will be given to individual voices, critically responding to others’ work, and the revision of one’s own stories. Class sessions will be used for discussion of assigned readings and work in progress. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a writing sample of three to five pages, one 200-level creative writing course, at least sophomore standing, and/or consent of the instructor. May be repeated for credit. Conference. Not offered 2009-10.

Mentors
Full course for one semester. This workshop is designed for students with considerable experience in writing short fiction. Students will read several stories by one published author, such as O’Connor, Hemingway, Cheever, or Gaitskill, in order to learn from these writers by investigating their range. Special emphasis will be given to individual voices, critical response to others’ work, and the revision of one’s own stories. Class sessions will be used for discussion of assigned readings and work in progress. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a writing sample of three to five pages, one 200-level creative writing course, at least sophomore standing, and consent of the instructor. May be repeated for credit. Conference. Not offered 2009-10.


Creative Writing 331 - Special Topics Studio

Found Poems
Full course for one semester. This class will focus on finding poems in unusual places—on political blogs, in newspapers, music lyrics, movies, want ads, in advertisements, by process of collaboration—everywhere. A large part of this class will be generative: we will spend a good deal of class time on in-class writing exercises, watching and listening to generative materials, all in an effort to broaden our sense of where we might find and how we might compose poetry. By course end students should have a series of poems composed by using and/or referencing nontraditional sources and materials. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a writing sample of three to five poems by the published deadline, Creative Writing 201 or 224, or by consent of the instructor. Conference. Not offered 2009-10.

Identity
Full course for one semester. One of the prevailing themes in literature is identity, and how we construct identity is complicated by social, economic, and cultural factors. In this course, students will focus on writing poems that directly create a multifaceted and universally compelling identity. We will use current events, family history, and mythology in an effort to stimulate the creative process. Students will work toward creating a portfolio of poems in which identity emerges as the primary theme. Most of our time will be spent assessing student work. This studio is designed for students who have had extensive creative writing workshop experience. Prerequisites: Creative Writing 224, a writing sample of three to five poems, and consent of instructor. Conference. Not offered 2009-10.

The Natural World
Full course for one semester. In this studio, students will investigate the natural world by visiting places like the Hoyt Arboretum, the Oregon Zoo, and the OMSI Planetarium. Our goal will be to produce work that reflects, is inspired by, and/or discusses what we’ve heard, seen, and learned. In the end, we will focus on “re-seeing” the world around us and writing about the relationship nature plays in our daily lives through the use of metaphor, image, and symbolism. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: a writing sample of three to five poems by the published deadline, and Creative Writing 201 or 224, or consent of the instructor. Conference. Not offered 2009-10.

Reading for Writers
Full course for one semester. There are many ways of reading. We read as fans, voyeurs, news gatherers, scholars. Writers can also read with a different set of goals in mind: to learn how to craft poems. In this course, our goal is to collect as much data as we can about the way master poets employ elements like narrative, image, metaphor, sound, rhythm, and pacing. We will then practice what we’ve learned by imitating master poets’ work. What students will learn in this class has as much to do with the craft of master poets as it does with their own stylistic, thematic, and craft preferences. We will read and imitate at least seven texts and engage in a traditional workshop of our imitations. Poets we study might include Snyder, Clifton, Forche, Hoagland, Doty, among others. We might tie some of our inquiries to the Visiting Writers Reading Series. Prerequisites: Creative Writing 201 or 224, a writing sample of three to five poems, and consent of the instructor. Conference. Not offered 2009-10.


Creative Writing 481 - Independent Study

One-half or full course for one semester. Independent writing projects. Prerequisite: consent of instructor and division.