Classics Course Descriptions

Greek


Greek 110 - First-year Greek

Full course for one year. A study of the elements of ancient Greek grammar and first readings in Attic prose. Lecture.

Greek 210 - Second-year Greek

Full course for one year. A review of grammar, continued readings in Attic prose, and first readings in Homer or drama. Prerequisite: Greek 110 or equivalent. Lecture-conference.

Greek 247 - Christian Texts of the Early Empire

See Religion 347 for description. Not offered 2008-09.

Greek 248 - Christian Philosophers, Poets, Historians, Magicians, and Burners of Books, 200–380 C.E.

See Religion 348 for description. Not offered 2008-09.
Religion 348 Description

Greek 249 - Late Antique and Byzantine Theological Texts

See Religion 349 for description. Not offered 2008-09.
Religion 349 Description

Greek 311 - Advanced Greek

Full course for one semester. Two of these semester topics are offered each year: Greek poetry, Greek tragedy, Greek comedy, Greek prose authors. Prerequisite: Greek 210 or equivalent. Seminar. May be repeated for credit.

Greek 312 - Advanced Greek

Full course for one semester. Two of these semester topics are offered each year: Greek poetry, Greek tragedy, Greek comedy, Greek prose authors. Prerequisite: Greek 210 or equivalent. Seminar. May be repeated for credit.


Latin


Latin 110 - First-year Latin

Full course for one year. A study of the elements of Latin grammar and first readings in Latin literature. Lecture.

Latin 210 - Second-year Latin

Full course for one year. A review of grammar and continued readings in Latin prose and poetry, with an introduction to Cicero’s rhetoric and Virgilian poetry. Prerequisite: Latin 110 or equivalent. Lecture-conference.

Latin 311 - Advanced Latin

Full course for one semester. Two of these semester topics are offered each year: Latin poetry, Roman satire, Roman comedy, Latin prose authors. Prerequisite: Latin 210 or equivalent. Seminar. May be repeated for credit.

Latin 312 - Advanced Latin

Full course for one semester. Two of these semester topics are offered each year: Latin poetry, Roman satire, Roman comedy, Latin prose authors. Prerequisite: Latin 210 or equivalent. Seminar. May be repeated for credit.

Latin 320 - Latin Prose Composition

Full course for one semester. This course offers an intensive study of Latin grammar and prose style that leads to the writing of connected prose passages in Latin. Prerequisite: Latin 210 or equivalent. Not offered 2008-09.


Classics 303 - Hellenistic Philosophy

Full course for one semester. The course examines the major schools and issues of Hellenistic philosophy. The course begins with a brief overview of Greek philosophy before the Hellenistic period and then examines the writings and philosophic doctrines of the Epicureans, Stoics, and Academic Skeptics. Discussions include various topics in ancient physics, epistemology, logic, and ethics. Prerequisite: Humanities 110 or consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Philosophy 303. Not offered 2008-09.
Philosophy 203 Description

Classics 338 - The Ancient "Novel"

Full course for one semester. With its absurd plots and apparent lack of moral depth, its interest in travel and the exotic, its insistence on positive female protagonists, its longevity, and its unfavorable critical reception, the Greek “novel” is strikingly different from other classical genres. This seminar will study those novels that remain intact (Daphnis and Chloe, Clitophon and Leucippe, About Callirhoe, and The Aethiopica), and compare them to their Roman counterparts (Petronius’ Satyricon and Apuleius’ Golden Ass). Topics studied will include characterization and narrative structure; the representation of the foreign; how the genre responded to its social context and to changes in that context over the 400 years or more that it existed; the novels’ precursors, including the Odyssey; and what is at stake in the designation of these works as novels. All works will be read in translation. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 338. Not offered 2008-09.

Classics 353 - Literary Theory and Classical Literature

Full course for one semester. This course explores some of the main currents in literary theory in the last 50 years and the application of these theories to selected classical works. The focus will be on three literary movements: (1) New Criticism, (2) structuralism and its various offshoots such as semiotics and narratology, and (3) Marxist literary theory, including political criticism and new historicism/cultural poetics. All non-English texts will be read in translation. Prerequisite: Humanities 110 or consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 353. Not offered 2008-09.

Classics 363 - Ancient Greek Theatre

Full course for one semester. The course explores the nature and meaning of fifth-century Greek theatre. It begins by examining theories about the origins of Greek tragedy, comedy, and the satyr play. The seminar will then read and discuss selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, and Menander. Attention will be given to interpreting the plays in the broader context of contemporary Athenian culture in which they were written and performed. In addition, articles that illustrate particular modern critical approaches will be read with the plays. The course will end with a comparative assessment of critical approaches to Greek drama, both ancient (Gorgias, Plato, and Aristotle) and modern. All works will be read in translation. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Conference. Cross-listed as Literature 363.

Classics 371 - Ancient History: Greece

Full course for one semester. This course offers a chronological survey of archaic and classical Greek history and civilization from the traditional foundation of the Olympic games in 776 BCE to the fall of the Athenian empire in 404 BCE. After beginning with a brief look at Bronze and Dark Age Greece, we will cover the following topics: the rise of the polis; Greek colonization; the “Age of Revolution,” warfare, aristocracy, and the spread of tyranny; the rise of Athens and Sparta; the Persian Wars; the development of Athens' democracy and empire; the causes and course of the Peloponnesian War; the development of ethnography and historical inquiry; and the nature of Greek social relations, with an emphasis on slavery and gender dynamics in Athens and Sparta. Emphasis is placed on the interpretation of ancient evidence, including primary literary works, inscriptions, and relevant archaeological material. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference. Cross-listed as History 391. Not offered 2008-09.
History 391 Description

Classics 373 - Ancient History: Rome

Full course for one semester. This course examines the development of the Roman state from its formation to the end of the fourth century CE, with a strong emphasis on the republican period and its political, economic, military, and social developments.  Topics include the nature of the republican constitution, agricultural and urban society, the rise of violence in Roman politics, public rhetoric and private morality, the creation of the principate under the guidance of Augustus, Rome and its neighbors, the role of the emperor in Roman society, and religious conflict under the emperors. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference. Cross-listed as History 393.
History 393 Description

Classics 375 - Special Topics in Greek and Roman History

Full course for one semester. Each special topics course offers an intensive study of a particular topic from Greek and/or Roman history. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the instructor. Lecture-conference. Cross-listed as History 395. May be repeated for credit. Not offered 2008-09.  

Classics 470 - Thesis

One-half or full course for one year.

Classics 481 - Independent Reading

One-half or full course for one semester. Prerequisite: approval of instructor and division.




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