COOLEY

DOUGLAS F. COOLEY MEMORIAL ART GALLERY, REED COLLEGE


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COOLEY GALLERY NEWS /


THE COOLEY WILL BE CLOSED FROM FRIDAY NOVEMBER 16, TO MONDAY NOVEMBER 20, FOR MAINTENANCE. WE WILL RE-OPEN TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 21.

WE ARE CLOSED THANKSGIVING DAY BUT OPEN THE DAY AFTER THANKSGIVING.



DORIAN: Rereading Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray

November 3 – December 10, 2017

Artists
: Robert Blanchon, Jim Dine, Eve Fowler,
and Storm Tharp
Writers: Oscar Wilde and Sara Jaffe
Scholars
: Jay Dickson, Daniel A. Novak,
and Kimberly J. Stern

OPENING RECEPTION:
November 3, 5:00pm–7:30pm

Symposium participants in attendance

PUBLIC SYMPOSIUM:
November 4, 10:30am–3:30pm

Psychology Bldg. room 105
Luncheon included, no reservations required
Presentations by: Daniel A. Novak, Kimberly J. Stern, Sara Jaffe, Storm Tharp, and Eve Fowler

Oscar Wilde’s 1890 novel The Picture of Dorian Gray is a rare work that chronicles an Orphic descent into art’s symbolic “soul,” examining the nature of human-object relations with fearless imagination and fantasy. Written during the waning of the Victorian era, the novel presents a morbid case study of “Art for art’s sake,” the mantra of Aestheticism articulated by Walter Pater in the late 1860s.

In keeping with Wilde’s philosophical, social, and aesthetic critique, the artists in Dorian examine art’s capacity to figure and expand the representation and expression of the self—through art, and as art—in response to moral and political issues as critical today as they were in Wilde’s time.

The larger exhibition project assembles artists, writers, and scholars for a public conversation with symposium attendees. A commissioned work of fiction by writer Sara Jaffe accompanies the exhibition.


The first edition of Dorian Gray was published in London in 1890 in Lippincott’s Monthly Magazine. In Victorian England, the work’s portrayal of same-sex desire caused a swift and angry response—so much so that Wilde was forced to significantly alter the work before it could be released in book form in 1891.

Eventually, the novel was used against Wilde during two of his three trials for “gross indecency.” On May 25, 1895 Wilde was convicted and sentenced to two years of hard labor at Reading Gaol, where he wrote one of his greatest works—De Profundis—an epistolary reflection on his relationship with Lord Alfred Douglas. Weakened by prison and penniless, Wilde died of meningitis in 1900 at forty-six, a victim of social and legal prejudice.

During the Cooley’s November 4th symposium, Portland-based artist Storm Tharp and writer Sara Jaffe will present their work alongside: Eve Fowler, Los Angeles-based artist; Daniel A. Novak, Associate Professor of English, University of Mississippi; and Kimberly J. Stern, Assistant Professor of English and Comparative Literature, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The symposium is organized and facilitated by Jay Dickson, Professor of English and Humanities, Reed College; and Stephanie Snyder, John and Anne Hauberg Director and Curator, Douglas F. Cooley Memorial Art Gallery, Reed College.

The symposium is generously supported by the Department of English, and the Office of the Dean of the Faculty.

Exhibition curator: Stephanie Snyder, John and Anne Hauberg Curator and Director, Douglas F. Cooley Memorial Art Gallery

Image: Storm Tharp, Cadre (detail), 2017. Ink, fabric dye, acrylic paint, charcoal, and spray paint on paper, 30 x 22 in. each. Courtesy the artist and PDX CONTEMPORARY ART

The exhibition and all related events are free and open to the public.



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THE DOUGLAS F. COOLEY MEMORIAL
ART GALLERY, REED COLLEGE
3203 SE WOODSTOCK BLVD.
PORTLAND, OREGON 97202-8199


HOURS: NOON TO 5 P.M., TUESDAY – SUNDAY, FREE
LOCATED ON THE MAIN FLOOR OF THE REED LIBRARY


The mission of the Douglas F. Cooley Memorial Art Gallery is to enhance the academic offerings of Reed College with a diverse range of scholarly exhibitions, lectures, and colloquia in its role as a teaching gallery.

The gallery was established by a generous 1988 gift from Sue and Edward Cooley and John and Betty Gray "in support of the teaching of art history at Reed College, as part of an interdisciplinary educational experience that strengthens the art history component of Reed's distinctive humanities program." Exhibitions are coordinated in collaboration with Reed faculty members and courses, with attention to the needs and interests of the larger Portland and Northwest arts communities. A schedule of three to four exhibitions during the academic year brings to Reed and the Portland community work that would not otherwise be seen in the region.



 
Stephanie Snyder
John and Anne Hauberg Curator and Director
Office: 503.777.7251
Fax: 503.788.6691
Cell: 503.367.7004
snyders[at]reed.edu

Colleen Gotze
Registrar and Program Coordinator
Office: 503.517.7851
Fax: 503.788.6691
gotzec[at]reed.edu

Greg MacNaughton
Education Outreach Coordinator
Calligraphy Initiative Coordinator
Office: 503-517-7677
Cell: 503.929-3663
Fax: 503.788.6691
macnaugg[at]reed.edu

Please email Registrar Colleen Gotze to be added to the Cooley Gallery announcement list and for general gallery questions.